Northern India Birding – December 2004 Chris and Jacky Mills

DAY ONE: 19th December 2004
Delhi – en route to Corbett NP 1330 – 1900
We arrived at Delhi airport at around 1:00pm; we were collected by Sumantha Ghosh of Wild World India and a driver. We undertook the colourful but rather arduous drive to Corbett NP – stopping off a couple of times the journey took around 6 hours. The first roadside birds we noted were

HOOPOE Chris Mills_Corbett2

 

 

 

WHITE-BREASTED KINGFISHERChris Mills_Corbett3

 

 

PARAKEET

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Chris Mills_Corbett5

 

 

 

 

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We arrived at Camp Forktail around 6:30PM had an evening curry, bottle of beer and sat around the campfire listening to the alarm calls of Sambar & Spotted Deer. Deprived of sleep for the last 20 hours and starting to feel the pinch, we were tucked up in our tent by 930PM.Overnight at Camp Forktail.

DAY TWO: 20th December 2004
Camp Forktail 0730 – 1000, Bhakrakot 1000 – 1300, Woodland east of campsite 1500 – 1730
The next morning we awoke around 6:45 as it was getting light, and we had an hours birding in the camp prior to breakfast. The first birds just outside the tent were a small group of BLACK-CHINNED BABBLERS, moments later we were gasping at a superb HIMALAYAN RUBYTHROAT it was sat motionless in a torpid state no doubt an affect of the cold dawn air. A full circuit of the campsite produced yet more excitement, the pick of birds being; 1 WHITE-THROATED FANTAIL, 3 LINEATED BARBET, 2 BLUE-THROATED BARBET, 10 SCARLET MINIVET, 1 BAR-WINGED FLYCATCHER SHRIKE & 2 GIANT HORNBILLS. The commonbirds around the campsite were clearly the HIMALAYAN BULBUL, ORIENTAL WHITEYE & ASHY PRINIA with groups of seen in most of the areas.

Chris Mills_Corbett7Breakfast was shared with the resident GREY
BUSHCHAT & JUNGLE BABBLERS, these hopped in and around the eating area.
After breakfast we decided to head north of the campsite, we walked up a path which passes through fields and the small village of Bhakrakhoot just beyond the village to the left the village fields border the edge of some secondary forest. The fields and village produced PALE MARTIN, 2 LONG-BILLED PIPIT, 10 GREY TREEPIE, ORIENTAL TRUTLE DOVE, 5+ LONG-TAILED SHRIKE, BLACK-CRESTED BULBUL 4+, CRESTED TREE SWIFT, RED-HEADED VULTURE, 6 YELLOW-BREASTED GREENFINCH. The woodland edge treated us some different species, 1 BLACK-LORED TIT, 2 GREY CAPPED PYGMY WOODPECKER, 2 LEMON RUMPED WARBELRS, 2 GREY HOODED WARBLERS, YELLOW-BELLIED FANTAIL,1 FULVOUS BREASTED WOODPECKER, 2 VELVET-FRONTED NUTHATCH, 1M SLATY BLUE FLYCATCHER,& 1 COMMON IORA.

Chris Mills_Corbett9We headed back for lunch around 1.30PM. After a lazy lunch, Kunwar our guide suggested we bird the woodland to the east of the campsite an area he was very familiar with. The woodland here is on a steep hillside that eventually leads down to a stream that eventually meets the road. Several new species were added including a couple of “must see” species; 2+WHITE-CRESTED LAUGHING THRUSH, 2 ASHY BULBUL, 3 GOLDEN SPECTACLED WARBLER, 1 KALIJ PHEASANT, 2 SPOTTED FORKTAIL, SEV BLUE WHISTLING THRUSH, and after many minutes of waiting 1 CHESTNUT-HEADED TESIA
Overnight at Camp Forktail.

 

DAY THREE: 21st December 2004
Camp Forktail 0730 – 1000, Bhakrakhot & Forest to North 1000 – 1300, Woodland east of campsite 1500 – 1730
We had decided to take things easy in the first couple of days and to that effect we spent the morning birding similar areas to yesterday morning – but continued to add new species to the list.
Many of the species from yesterday were seen again – but additional species today were STREAK-THROATED WOODPECKER, SCALY BELLIED WOODPECKER, GREATER YELLOWNAPE, BLACK-WINGED CUCKOO SHRIKE,& ASIAN BARRED OWLET.
After a ” brunch” we headed up North of the campsite again, but this time continued past the village, following the footpath we eventually reached a good area of secondary forest, with a fast running stream down a wooded hillside to our right. This area yielded pulses of birds in tight feeding flocks, birds such as 5 GREY HOODED WARBLER, 1 STREAKED LAUGHING THRUSH, 2 BLUE WINGED MINLA, 20 GREY HEADED CANARY FLYCATCHER, 3 TICKELLS WARBLER, 1 RUSTY-CHEEKED SCIMITAR BABBLER, 3 CHESTNUT-BELLIED NUTHATCH, 2 WHITE-TAILED NUTHATCH, 3 VELVET-FRONTED NUTHATCH, 1 RUFOUS BELLIED EAGLE, 1 GREAT BARBET, 2 WHISKERED YUHINA, 2 SPOTTED FORKTAIL, 2 HUMES WARBLER, 1 RED-BILLED BLUE MAGPIE,& 20+ LEMON-RUMPED WARBLER. We returned to camp had a late afternoon cup of tea, and walked the area east of the camp again, adding new species such as HIMALAYAN FLAMEBACK & RUFOUS GORGETED FLYCATCHER. Kunwar showed us Leopard scats, and we found leaves still holding the animals urine from where the animal had been territory scent-marking. Following the tracks, we found an area of ground that had been disturbed, and lots of deer hair – Kunwar explained that this was clearly a kill from the previous evening.
Overnight at Camp Forktail.

DAY FOUR: 22nd December 2004
Forktail – Kosi River 0700 – 1200, Machore Mountain road 1230 – 1600
The day started with some early excitement, Ghosh from Wild World India whom organised our trip had arrived just before light and as he approached the camp he had seen a wild Indian Elephant. Breakfast was temporarily abandoned as we searched the area.
Unfortunately despite hearing the movements of the elephant we were unable to see it – incredibly! We did add couple more birds to the list in the form of BLACK-HEADED ORIOLE & MAROON ORIOLE.
After breakfast we headed out in a Suzuki jeep with Ghosh our host and Kunwar our guide. Our first stop was the Kosi River area which produced 5 WHITE-CAPPED WATER REDSTART, 12 PLUMBEOUS WATER REDSTART, 1PR at NEST BROWN DIPPER, SPOTTED FORKTAIL, 2 WHITE-BROWED WAGTAIL, 1 RIVER LAPWING, 1 ROOSTING BROWN FISH OWL, 1PR at NEST PALLAS’S FISH EAGLE, 80 SLATY-HEADED PARAKEET, 1 GOLDEN LEAFBIRD, 20 SCARLET MINIVET, 10 COMMON WOODSHRIKE.
We continued our journey up into the
mountains via the Machore mountain road, it was noticeable even since our last visit 3 years ago how few Vultures were present, but we did see 2 HIMLAYAN GRIFFON VULTURES & 13 EURASIAN GRIFFON VULTURES.
The views along this road towards the top are breathtaking, and the distant backdrop of the snow-capped Himalayas offers a fantastic perspective. We made several stops, the weather was cloudy and cool and this hampered our search for some of the altitude species such as accentors. However, we had a pleasant mix of birds including 1 LITTLE SWIFT, 2 RED-BILLED BLUE MAGPIE, 1 STEPPE EAGLE, 2 RUFOUS-BELLIED EAGLE, 6 COMMON ROSEFINCH, 1 JUNGLE OWLET, 1 ASHY DRONGO,4 BLUE-CAPPED REDSTART AND 2 BLUE BREASTED QUAIL.
Overnight at Camp Forktail.

Chris Mills_Corbett10DAY FIVE: 23rd December 2004
Corbett NP Bajranei Gate 0700 – 1600
The next morning we breakfasted early and were heading through the Corbett National Park gates at 7am, our efforts today were mainly from the jeep in the Bajranei area. There are rest areas in the park and here you can get out and wander to bird. Everyone’s senses were heightened knowing this was our first really good chance of seeing TIGER, our previous visit to India, taking in Ranthambhore and Corbett had only resulted in near misses and lots of pugmarks.
The first birds were en-route to and at the main rest area just inside the park, best birds here were, 5 FULVOUS-BREASTED WOODPECKER, 2 LESSER YELLOWNAPE, 4 HIMLAYAN FLAMEBACK, 10+BLACK-RUMPED FLAMEBACK, 3 COPPERSMITH BARBET, 1 CRESTED KINGFISHER, 1 ALEXANDRINE PARAKEET,1 ASIAN BARRED OWLET, 3 JUNGLE OWLET, 1 CRESTED SERPENT EAGLE, 1 CHANGEABLE HAWK EAGLE, 2 GOLDEN FRONTED LEAFBIRD it was a cold morning and a torpid WRYNECK, allowed me to approach it down to 2.0m.
Chris Mills_Corbett11As we continued through the park several times we tracked fresh tiger pug marks, but still failed to see any tigers! The bird list continued with the pick of birds being 1 BAY-BACKED SHRIKE, 20+ BLACK-HEADED ORIOLE, 3 LESSER RACKET TAILED DRONGO, 1 SLATY BLUE FLYCATCHER, 5+ CHESTNUT BELLIED NUTCHATCH, 2 WHITE-TAILED NUTHATCH, 12+ VELVET FRONTED NUTHATCH, 2 OLIVE-BACKED PIPIT, 2 WHISKERED YUHINA, 1 WHITES THRUSH, 1 GREY FRANCOLIN (heard only) plus many of the commoner species. Our mammal list got well under way with 30+ HANUMAN LANGUR, 50+ RHESUS MACAQUE, 4 WILD BOAR, 20+ MUNTJAC, 8+ SAMBAR DEER, 2+ PALM SQUIRREL, 50+ CHITAL and at least 4 different sets of tiger pugmarks – but no tiger. Overnight at Camp Forktail.

Chris Mills_Corbett12DAY SIX: 24th December 2004
Camp Forktail 0700 – 0900, Vanghat River Lodge 1000-1700
The short walk from the tent to the dining area produced close views of BLACK FRANCOLIN, and rather more impressive were a stunning RUFOUS BELLIED NILTAVA & 2 RUFOUS ORGETED FLYCATCHER.
After breakfast we were dropped off from the jeep and we then walked a 3 mile descent to our destination for this afternoon and evening at Bhanghat fishing Lodge. This lodge is owned by Ghosh of WildWorld India, it hosts a wonderful small stone cottage in the most fantastic setting of forested mountains and the fast running Ramganga river. The birding was just as good, 5 PLUM-HEADED PARAKEET, 1 LARGE TAILED NIGHTJAR, 1 RIVER LAPWING, 1 PALLAS’S FISH EAGLE, 2 ORIENTAL HONEY BUZZARD, 1 BLACK STORK, 2 GREEN MAGPIE, 2 WHITE BELLIED DRONGO, 1 BROWN DIPPER, 1 BLACK REDSTART, 6+ WHITE-CAPPED WATER REDSTART, 5+ PLUMBEOUS WATER REDSTART, 1 SPOTTED FROKTAIL, 2 CHESTNUT-BELLIED NUTHATCH, 4 VELVET FRONTED NUTHATCH, & 1 WALLCREEPER.
Chris Mills_Corbett13The river is famous for Mahseer, and Mahseer angling, encouraged by Ghosh to have a go I tried my luck for a few hours, but despite being able to see a shoal containing some huge fish in the lovely clear water – my luck was out. However, I was accompanied on the rocks just 20m away by a LITTLE FORKTAIL, the first of the trip.
As we walked out of the valley in the early afternoon we had 80 SLATY HEADED PARAKEET, 1 EMERALD DOVE, 1 EURASIAN GRIFFON VULTURE, 2 BLACK STORK, 4 NEPAL HOUSE MARTIN, 1 WHITE THROATED FANTAIL.

 

Chris Mills_Corbett14During the rest of the afternoon we explored 3 ravines just off the road that leads to Camp Forktail, all of these areas held reasonable numbers of birds and are well worth exploring, these areas produced 1 GREATER FLAMEBACK, 3 LESSER YELLOWNAPE, 4 HIMALAYAN FLAMEBACK, 1 SHIKRA, 2 GREEN MAGPIE, 2 GREY HEADED CANARY FLYCATCHER, RED-BILLED LEIOTHRIX, 2 MARRON ORIOLE, 1 YELLOW BREASTED FANTAIL, 5 BLUE-WINGED MINLA & 2 GREAT HORNBILL these being at the entrance to Camp Forktail.Overnight at Vanghat River Lodge.

Chris Mills_Corbett15DAY SEVEN: 26th December 2004
Lohachaur 0800 – 1530, Camp Forktail 1530- 1700
Today we set off for Lohachaur a buffer zone of the Corbett NP, this enabled us to bird on foot in primary forest, best birds were 1 RED JUNGLEFOWL, 4 KALIJ PHEASANT, 1 LESSER YELLOWNAPE, 1 GREATER YELLOWNAPE, 1 HIMALAYAN FLAMEBACK, 5 GREEN MAGPIE, 3 LONG TAILED MINIVET, 20+ SCARLET MINIVET, 8 BAR-WINGED FLYCATCHER SHRIKE, 3 YELLOW BELLIED FANTAIL, 2 WHITE BROWED FANTAIL, 5+ ASHY DRONGO, 15 BRONZED DRONGO, 2 RUFOUS GORGETED FLYCATCHER, 2 TAIGA FLYCATCHER, 3 RUFOUS BELLIED NILTAVA, 1 WHITE RUMPED SHAMA, 10 CHESTNUT BELLIED NUTHATCH, 2 WHITE TAILED NUTHATCH, 3+ VELVET FRONTED NUTHATCH, 5+ ASHY BULBUL, 10+ LEMON RUMPED WARBLER, 20 WHITE CRESTED LAUGHING THRUSH, 2 PUFF THROATED BABBLER, 1 MRS. GOULDS SUNBIRD, 4+ MAROON ORIOLE. The track eventually reaches the Ramganga river and provides excellent panoramic views over the forest hills and resulted in additional species, overhead we noted 80 CRESTED TREE SWIFT, 10 ASIAN PALM SWIFT, 30 NEPAL HOUSE MARTIN, 10 EURASIAN GRIFFON VULTURE, 1 CRESTED SERPENT EAGLE, 1 ORIENTAL HONEY BUZZARD, 1 BONELLI’S EAGLE. The river added 2 CRESTED KINGFISHER, 2 RIVER LAPWING, 1 BLACK STORK, both species of WATER REDSTART, 1 LITTLE FORKTAIL.
We also had nice views of a small party of SMOOTH COATED OTTER, followed later by close up views of GOLDEN JACKAL, also the usual mix of CHITAL, SAMBAR, MUNTJAC, RHESUS MACAQUE & HANAMAN LANGHUR.The day ended with one more species for the trip being added, when a ROSE-BREASTED PARAKEET flew over the campsite.
Overnight at Camp Forktail.
Chris Mills_Corbett16DAY EIGHT: 27th December 2004
Dhikala, Corbett NP 0630 – 1600
We left camp early this morning as we set off for Dhikala, an area in the innermost part of Corbett NP. We were to be based there for the next 4 days and had been told that this area had been extremely good for seeing Tiger – so hopes were running high.
We made several stops at appointed rest and viewing areas, the habitat was forest interspersed with boulstrewn streams, and dried out riverbeds.
The pick of the birds during the morning were 3 BLUE THROATED BARBET, 2 COPPERSMITH BARBET, 4 CRESTED KINGFISHER,12 ALEXANDRINE PARAKEET, 2 JUNGLE OWLET, 1 LESSER FISH EAGLE, 1 PALLAS’S FISH EAGLE, 1 CINEREOUS VULTURE, 1 RED-HEADED VULTURE, 2 CRESSERPENT EAGLE, one of the most charismatic birds of the trip COLLARED FALCONET, & 1 PIED KINGFISHER that was lucky to survive the persistent dives and pursuit of a PEREGRINE, eventually submerging itself in the river to save itself.
The river and its banks also yielded MARSH CROCODILE (4-5M LONG) & a very large CATFISH.
As we headed into the forest areas stops produced 1 GREEN MAGPIE, 5 LONG TAILED MINIVET, 1 SLATY BACKED FLYCATCHER, 1 CHESTNUT HOODED TESIA, 20+ LEMON RUMPED WARBLER, 5 GREY HEADED WARBLER, 1 RED-WHISKERED BULBUL, 10 BLACK-
CHINNED BABBLER, 3 BLUE WINGED MINLA, 1 WHITES THRUSH & the familiar mix of woodpeckers & nuthatches already seen.
Chris Mills_Corbett17As early afternoon approached, Kunwar & Ghosh led us to a 12m high watchtower that overlooked the river, the view was panoramic and the horizon distant. We settled down on top of the platform to enjoy our lunch, but before we had chance to take a second mouthful, Kunwar started a panic without even raising his binoculars he hissed ” TIGER, TIGER crossing the river”, there was 2 – a Tigress and a 9 month old cub.

Chris Mills_Corbett18They were distant but through the scopwe had terrific views, they crossed steadily the cub noticing our attentions, giving a couple of low calls – mother led the way seemingly unbothered by her cubs concerns. All the surrounding Chital & Sambar stood to attention. For 2-3 minutes we had watched them, it seemed it a lot longer then they were gone, disappearing into the vegetation.
After the excitement had died down and we had finished our lunch and Ghosh and Kunwar took us to an elephant station where they hoped we could take an elephant ride and catch up with the Tiger we had just seen. The elephant ride was an experience not to be missed, despite not relocating the tigers we had fantastic views of many of the river birds, the birds allowing much closer approach.
Chris Mills_Corbett19The best birds were 1 STORK-BILLED KINGFISHER, 6 WHITE-BREASTED KINGFISHER, 4 CRESTED KINGFISHER, 2 PIED KINGFISHER, 6 RIVER LAPWING, & 1 BLACK-NECKED STORK.
We were off the elephant and back in the jeep at around 4:30PM our next stop was Dhikala camp. But the day wasn’t quite finished, as we crossed a dried river bed en-route, Kunwar glimpsed something in the late afternoon light – the driver quickly reversed, about 25m away stood a superb adult TIGRESS – she instinctively lowered herself tight to the ground, we drove up the hill and then cutting the engine rolled back down to see if she had moved – she had and we glimpsed her a couple of times in the vegetation- fantastic!!
Chris Mills_Corbett20We just made camp in time to avoid the late gate fine – but I would have happily have paid the fine. Footnote: We returned to the dried riverbed the following night at the same time, and saw the same Tigress and briefly a male Tiger, but views were limited to “stripes and eyes in the vegetation”.
Overnight at Dhikala.


DAY NINE: 28th December 2004

Dhikala, Corbett NP 0730 – 1700
Breakfast was entertaining as from the restaurant window we watched 5 GOLDEN JACKALS playing, as 2 CHITAL kept a close eye. We then headed out in the jeep to the grassland areas that adjoining the Ramganga reservoir. The reservoir does not have a great reputation for wetland birds, but nevertheless with the surrounding grassland offers a very different habitat to the rest of the park, it is a vast area with many tracks – and we added several new species for the trip. Some of the birds on today’s list were 5 INDIAN PEAFOWL, 5 BLACK FRANCOLIN, 3 GREAT EGRET, 2 INTERMEDIATE EGRET, 20+ LITTLE EGRET, 5+ GREY HERON, 30 RED-RUMPED SWALLOW, 1 BLUETHROAT, 3 HEN HARRIER, 2 WOOLLY NECKED STORK, TEAL, 1 GREENSHANK, 2 OSPREY, 30+ ZITTING CISTICOLA, 3 INDIAN POND HERON, 2 PALLAS’S FISH EAGLES, 5 RED WATTLED LAPWING, 2 CHANGEABLE HAWK EAGLE, 3 HOOPOE, 6 CINEREOUS VULTURE,2 LONG-BILLED VULTURE, 3 RED-HEADED VULTURE, 1 COLLARED FALCONET, 30 SLATY HEADED PARAKEET, 50+ CRESTED TREE SWIFT, 4 COMMON SNIPE, 1 LESSER COUCAL, 10+ INDIAN BUSHLARK, 1M HODGSONS BUSHCHAT (this rare and localized bird was an excellent find after checking hundreds of Stonechats!), 100+ STONECHAT, 2 STRIATED PRINIA, 30+ ASHY PRINIA, 1 LONG-BILLED PIPIT, & 3 TAWNY PIPIT.
Chris Mills_Corbett21Mammals were very numerous around the lake and surrounding habitat, 50+ CHITAL, 15+ SAMBAR, 50+ RHESUS MACAQUE, 50+ HANUMAN LANGUR, 8 GOLDEN JACKAL, & 20 WILD BOAR.
Back at camp we finished the day with a very obliging RED-BREASTED/TAIGA FLYCATCHER, an instructive bird that we eventually ascribed to TAIGA “albicilla”.
Overnight at Dhikala.

Chris Mills_Corbett22DAY TEN: 29th December 2004
Dhikala, Corbett NP 0730 – 1700
Our destination today was Kanda hill on the North side of the lake and then higher up tmountain bungalow for lunch. As we crossed the Ramaganga river we had, the now expected mix of Storks, Egrets & Kingfishers.
A brief stop along scrub before the river produced a new trip bird, with a group of 10 YELLOW-EYED BABBLERS.
The birding got more challenging and exciting as we headed into hilly primary forest, 2 stops produced a good number of birds, but nothing new – then came the call of a much sought after species, minutes passed, and all of a sudden they were in the tree tops above us, not just one but a flock of about 8-9 LONG-TAILED BROADBILLS absolutely stunning. A supporting cast of 4 GREY-CAPPED PYGMY WOODPECKER, 1 LESSER YELLOWNAPE, 6 GREY HEADED WOODPECKER, 2 GREATER FLAMEBACK, 4 SCARLET MINIVET, 10 YELLOW-BELLIED FANTAIL, 2 WHITE THROATED FANTAIL, 1 RUFOUS BELLIED NILTAVA, 5 CHESTNUT BELLIED NUTHATCH, 2 WHITE TAILED NUTHATCH, 2 VELVET FRONTED NUTHATCH, BAR-TAILED TREECREEPER, 5 BLACK-LORED TIT, 2 BLACK THROATED TIT, 10 LEMON RUMPED WARBLER, 1 GREENISH WARBLER & 1 GREY HEADED WARBLER. We continued upwards in the fine forest habitat, our journey came to an abrupt end when we reached a 30m tree that had recently fallen – straight across the track. We stopped for lunch watching some local village women collecting cattle fodder by climbing the trees and stripping leaves, our guide informed these people had walked 8 miles from their village to collect the correct leaves – and would be returning with their load in the afternoon.
Shortly after lunch we started to head back, a stop produced a another nice mixed flock, but also several WHITE-BROWED SHRIKE BABBLER and a few minutes later a lone superb male CHESTNUT-BELLIED ROCK THRUSH was another addition to the trip list.
We headed down towards the shoreline of the Ramganga reservoir this time viewing the Reservoir from its northern shoreline. Overhead we picked out a single ALPINE SWIFT, amongst a mass of CRESTED TREESWIFT. A line of guano covered trees held roosting GREAT CORMORANTS, and an inlet a single GOOSANDER. The real highlight from here, although distant was a wild group of 20 INDIAN ELEPHANT.
Overnight at Dhikala.

Chris Mills_Corbett23DAY ELEVEN: 30th December 2004
Dhikala, Corbett NP 0730 – 1500
After breakfast (a non-event for me after a night of visiting the loo!) we got to grips with both SCALY BREASTED MUNIA & RED AVADAVAT, we had probably seen both in preceding days but on most occasions they would explode from the grass verge and disappear into the distance!
We then slowly headed back from Dhikala towards the main entrance of the NP, making several stops we saw a varied mix of similar birds and mammals as per the previous 3 days. We did however witness a SHIKRA kill and then pluck a Yellownape, with a GREEN MAGPIE in close attendance awaiting its turn. The other species of note today were a RUSTY-CHEEKED SCIMITAR BABBLER, which after much patience eventually gave reasonable views, 1 BLUE-WINGED MINLA & 3 BLACK BULBUL.
We were greeted back at Forktail by our hosts and we spent a wonderful evening around the campfire relaying our tales of 5 Tigers, and a wonderful array of birds.
Overnight at Camp Forktail.

Chris Mills_Corbett24DAY TWELVE: 31ST December 2004
Camp Forktail 0800 – 1130, Vanghat River Lodge 1300 – 1700
Our last day before heading back to Delhi, we decided on some casual birding around Forktail in the morning and then returning to Gharat River Lodge for a quiet New Years Eve.
The HIMALAYAN RUBYTHROAT was again showing well before breakfast, the usual mix of birds
were around the camp, also 1 GOLDEN FRONTED LEAFBIRD, plus a flock of 25+LINEATED & 6 BLUE THROATED BARBET passed straight through the campsite.
On the fields between camp and the village 20 YELLOW-BREASTED GREENFINCH were feeding and a flock of 30 BLACK-CRESTED BULBUL passed through.

Chris Mills_Corbett26We said our farewells to all of the wonderful staff at Camp Forktail Creek and headed off to Gharat River Lodge. We walked in via the big modern suspension bridge this time, the dried out area in front of the bridge immediately produced two new species fro the trip, 1M DESERT WHEATEAR & 1 VARIABLE WHEATEAR.
The day finished watching 1 LITTLE FORKTAIL, 1 WALLCREEPER, WATER REDSTARTS and the graceful hawking overhead of 30 BRONZED DRONGO.
Overnight at Vanghat River Lodge.

 

 

 

DAY THIRTEEN: 16th April 2004
En route to Delhi
We said fond farewells to both Ghosh and Kunwar whom had not just been great guides, but also wonderful company. Traveled back to Delhi- noted the usual masses of BLACK KITES & EGRETS ETC
Overnight at Hotel Connaught, Delhi – flew back to UK next morning.

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Wild World India strives to stimulate an interest and help develop an understanding of the rich natural heritage of the Indian subcontinent. We believe in working closely with our identified network of local naturalists and guides, the ‘insiders’ who have the knowledge to make your wildlife experience both exciting and enriching.

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