Tadoba-Andhari, Pench and Kanha Tiger Reserves

Preface.

India is a very interesting country to visit, and having both been there several times before, we really looked forward to another holiday on the subcontinent. No doubt, we
would have loved some more time there but, dictated by work, eleven days was all we could muster this time around. We’re both birders first and foremost, but mammals is an ever growing interest for us as well, and travelling to this part of India they just naturally seem to take center stage. It would probably be quite interesting and rewarding with a longer trip to the areas visited (and others nearby) with a greater emphasis on the birds since a lot is obviously still to learn.

Travel arrangements.

The trip was planned on short notice towards the end of 2015, but luckily our good friend Vikram Singh of Wild World India was up the challenge. Despite limited time he made a really good itinerary for us, just like he has done on previous casions. Anyone travelling to India is well advised to use the services of Wild World India, and we can give no better recommendation than the fact that we keep coming back ourselves. No domestic flights were necessary on this journey, since we found some really good international departures. From Copenhagen we flew directly to Doha with Qatar Airways, and from there we could go straight on to Nagpur after a good two hour stop over. We touched down in India in the middle of the night, were icked up at the airport and driven to Tadoba, arriving early in the morning, ready to go on our first game drive. The return trip was equally efficient. After finishing the afternoon game drive in Kanha, we were transferred to Nagpur where we arrived in time for a very late dinner before boarding the 3.45 departure for Doha. Again there was a two hour stop over in Qatar before our direct flight back to Denmark. We reckon it will be almost impossible to optimize time better than that. Since there are quite a few interesting parks in Central India, and we had only limited time, it was a bit difficult to make the final decision on which parks to include on the trip. However, Tadoba was almost a given since finding Tigers was an absolute top priority for us, and this seemed like the best place to do so. Though Stig had been there before, Kanha was also a place we wanted to include since it’s such a scenic park with good chances of seeing Tiger also, and with a somewhat different avifauna than the other parks. Because it had to be a short holiday, we wanted to spend as little time as possible on the road. For that reason Pench was an attractive alternative since it is situated nicely between Tadoba and Kanha. Melghat, famous for the Forest Owlet, didn’t make the cut since it seems to have little else to offer and, like Satpura, it’s a bit out of the way compared with the other parks. Given more time we would have loved to go to Satpura as well. It sounds like a really interesting place and is apparently good for Sloth Bear and Indian Giant Squirrel as well as a few birds difficult to see in the other parks.

Sites visited.

Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve: As mentioned we had included Tadoba mainly because it seemed like the safest bet when it comes to seeing Tiger, but it also has a reputation for being a good places for Dhole – a species neither of us had seen before. The promise of these attractive mammals and more, made us see past our reservations about the park otherwise being rather dull and congested with unattractive paved roads. However, to our joy, the park was much nicer than expected, with rolling hills covered in a mix of bamboo and teak forest interspersed with lakes and meadows. Furthermore since we were mainly game driving in the northern part of the reserve, we primarily moved on dirt tracks which, though dusty, is much more to our liking than paved roads. The only paved road we travelled was the “main road” leading from Lake Tadoba south towards Lake Telia and Moharli Gate. To be honest, the park is a little bit crowded, though seemingly not much visited by Western tourists which is rather odd. However, it wasn’t much worse than Pench or other tiger reserves, and it is perfectly possible to find peace and quiet on some of the roads less traveled. On the positive side, the game drives are relatively long with the morning drive stretching from 6 to 11 am, and the afternoon drive between 2 and 6 pm – much appreciated by us! The
wildlife certainly didn’t disappoint either and we saw the hoped for Tigers and Wild Dogs really well on several occasions. Other highlights were Leopard which we saw twice, both times extremely well, and Four-horned Antelope. We also saw a single Jungle Cat one afternoon, and Northern Red Muntjac was surprisingly common and easy to see. Sloth Bear was also seen during our stay here, though, unfortunately not by us, and there’s an abundance of more common species like Chital, Sambar and Southern Plains Grey Langur. Bird watching was also quite rewarding, both in the reserve and around the lodge, and we saw a umber of species here, like Grey Junglefowl, Savanna Nightjar, Indian Pitta and Purple-rumped Sunbird, which we didn’t get anywhere else. Pench Tiger Reserve: Pench was probably included more out of convenience than because of its own qualities. However, we were glad that we went there and would actually have liked to see more of this scenic reserve. Compared to Tadoba this park is more hilly with rocky outcrops in places. The forest is also quite different and more open, with bamboo and teak giving way to other species of trees. Like in Tadoba we also found both Tiger and Dhole in Pench and even saw the latter trying to hunt down a young Sambar. The supporting cast amongst the mammals was also pretty much the same as in Tadoba, but we did add the magnificent Indian Giant Flying Squirrel here – a truly great experience! Birding was also pretty good, and no doubt the two Mottled Wood Owls on day roost were among the highlights of the entire trip. The likes of Golden-fronted Leafbird, Bay-backed Shrike and surprisingly Grey Bushchat and Brown Rockchat were only seen here. We furthermore managed to do an excellent birdwalk outside the reserve, seeing Asian Paradise-flycatcher, Ultramarine Flycatcher and other beautiful species on Wednesday afternoon when all the Central Indian national parks are closed. Game driving times are not quite as good as in Tadoba, with the morning drive starting half an hour later at 6.30 am and the afternoon drive a full hour later at 3 pm – the same times apply in…
Kanha Tiger Reserve: Expectations were high for this large reserve, and even if we didn’t actually see any of the big cats here, we weren’t disappointed. The lack of Tiger sightings here frustrated Rajan a bit, since this is his “backyard”, and he certainly tried everything to get one. No doubt they are around and we were just very unlucky not to see one or more, arriving or departing just a few minutes late or early on several occasions. Luckily we had already seen Tiger, and were thus able to better appreciate the other qualities of the park. The number of tourists here is probably even bigger than Tadoba, and with a proportionally larger share of Western visitors, but because of the sheer size of the reserve it’s not felt in the same way. This is also by far the most lush of the three reserves visited, and the forest is pretty dense in most places, making it more difficult to find Tigers, of course. Kanha is also even more hilly than Pench, contains large meadows and is just generally an amazingly beautiful place! Compared to the other parks, Barasingha was a new addition to the mammal list here, and so was Northen Plains Grey Langur (apparently) and Common Palm Civet. Worth a mention is also our encounters with flying squirrels outside the park – again a really cool experience. Bird life was very good in and around the reserve, and we saw a few surprise species like Roufous-bellied Hawk Eagle and White-tailed Rubythroat here. Many more bird species were seen only here on the trip and we were glad to add the likes of Red Junglefowl, Lesser Adjudant, Malabar Pied Hornbill, White-rumped Spinetail, Sirkeer Malkoha, Scarlet and Small Minivet, Brown-cheeked Fulvetta, Hair-crested Drongo, Velvet-fronted Nuthatch and many more. Certainly a more dedicated bird watching trip to this area would produce a lot of interesting sightings, and it’s definitely also a reserve worth another visit in general.

Accommodation & food.

The accommodation on this trip was a bit more upscale than we’re used to when travelling independently. However, sometimes it’s nice to indulge in a bit of luxury as well, so no complaints about that. We were really well treated by management and staff everywhere, but it’s probably fair to say that Svasara Jungle Lodge in Tadoba had the most personal feel to it. This lodge is very conveniently situated within easy walking distance to Kolara Gate and there are quite a few interesting birds in the garden as well. In Tadoba we also spend a single night in nearby Chava Resort which was okay but nowhere near the standard of Svasara. Tuli Tiger Corridor in Pench seems to be a weekend hangout for the Nagpur elite and frankly a bit overwhelming. The house we stayed in was big but very nice, and the ponds and garden on the grounds were fairly good for birdwatching. In Kanha we stayed at Tuli Tiger Resort which was a very nice place indeed. The rooms weren’t quite as extravagant as in Pench, though still more than adequate, but the garden and surroundings were really nice, and we saw quite a few interesting birds and mammals here. The food was excellent in all three lodges, and we were very pleased that apparently no special effort had been made to accommodate the taste of European and American tourists. Some of the dishes were spicy, though not overly so, and no Shepherd’s Pie and other weird stuff were served, unlike at some of the other lodges we’ve stayed at. The packed breakfast was also quite nice throughout, and the kitchen hygiene was probably good as well, since neither of us had any stomach issues on the trip.

Weather.

Throughout the trip the weather was pretty good. Except for one morning in Kanha, which started out with a bit of rain and generally damp and cloudy conditions, it was mostly sunny with daytime temperatures reaching 30°C. Mornings were rather more chilly with temperatures between 5 and 10°C, so warm cloth was necessary on the early game drives. Wind wasn’t much of a factor on this trip, and visibility mostly good, so all in all a welcome change from the dreary Danish winter weather! One thing to consider when visiting the parks in Central India this time of year is dust. Especially when going into and leaving the parks, but also in between, you’ll find yourself driving behind other cars, and since you’ll be sitting out in the open, this will almost inevitably be a very dusty experience. For that reason it’s a good idea to bring some kind of bag to protect photo equipment.

Drivers & guides.

We were taken by four different cars and drivers on the transfers between the parks, and to and from Nagpur. They all did very well and even if some of the drives were fairly long, and some were done at night, we always felt safe on these transfers. The drivers who took us into the parks also did a good job in general. As well as driving, some of them participate actively in tracking down wildlife, but unfortunately they all seem to share the same philosophy that getting closer is always better. In addition to the driver, a local guide is compulsory on all game drives and the quality of these
aried considerably. Some were really good and very committed while others didn’t seem to care at all. Besides the local guides we also had our very own guide – Rajendra Jhariya – with us throughout the trip, except on the transfer to and from Nagpur. Rajan is working as a guide in Kanha but also knows the other Central Indian parks well, and he did an extremely good job for us. Always in a good mood, respected by, and well connected with, other guides and staff in the parks, very good at spotting wildlife and positioning the car for photos, and always very flexible in order to make the most of every opportunity. Before we left home, we we’re satisfied that we had optimized our program as much as at all possible, but he still managed to squeeze in an extra game drive and a bird walk in Kanha as well as other extracurricular activities. We have no reservations what so ever about recommending his services to other travellers in this part of the India! If you don’t have your own guide, most (or maybe all?) of the better lodges will have guides/naturalists on the staff. We met a few of them as well, and some, not least at Svasara Jungle Lodge, actually seemed very good indeed.

Contact information.

Any questions regarding our trip or the report are welcome on either of the following e-mail addresses: Stig: sej@primoris.dk or Jon: jon.lehmberg@gmail.com If you need help planing your trip, or are perhaps looking for a completely tailor-made holiday, we can strongly recommend Wild World India. Vikram and his staff are highly experienced, have a number of excellent guides attached and will do everything to make the perfect itinerary for their clients. Please check the website for further information here: www.wildworldindia.com If you’re going to Kanha and other Central Indian national parks as an independent traveller, and are looking for a guide to assist you, Rajan will be an excellent choice. As mentioned above we have nothing but praise for his personal and professional skills, and are certain that anyone fortunate enough in securing his services will agree. Rajan can be contacted in advance via e-mail on this address: rajendrakanhaguide@gmail.com , or you can probably just ask for him at Khatia Gate where everybody will know him.

Lists & literature.

We brought the following books on the trip: “Birds of South Asia – The Ripley Guide” vol. 1 (Rasmussen & Anderton), “Birds of the Indian Subcontinent” (Grimmett & Inskipp) and “Mammals of India” (Menon). The daily notes and bird list below follow the systematics of “The Howard and Moore Complete Checklist to the Birds of the World” (3rd edition), while the mammal list is based on “Mammals of the World A Checklist” (Duff & Lawson) and the IUCN website. Where only the names Tadoba, Pench or Kanha is used, it means that the record can be from either inside the reserve itself or from the surrounding area, while inclusion of the abbreviation “TR” (i.e. Kanha TR) means that the record is made inside the actual reserve. This is true for both the day-to-day list and the species list. The following abbreviations are used: Ad = adult ; imm = immature ; juv = juvenile ; h = heard ; f = female ; m = male ; TR = Tiger Reserve.
5/2
Arriving in Nagpur – transfer to Tadoba – morning game drive – check-in at Svasara Jungle Lodge and a bit of birding there –afternoon game drive. Tadoba 6.00 – 18.00. Red Spurfowl 2 , Grey Junglefowl 9m+7f , Indian Peafowl 35 , Lesser Whistling-duck 6 , Asian Openbill 2 , Black-headed Ibis 5 , Indian Black Ibis 7 , Indian Pond Heron 4 , Cattle Egret 30 , Intermediate Egret 3 , Little Egret 3 , Little Cormorant 25 , Darter 3 , Oriental Honey Buzzard 2 , Black-winged Kite 2 , Short-toed Eagle 1 , Crested Serpent Eagle 1h+1 , Shikra 1 , White-eyed Buzzard 1 , Common Moorhen 1 , Eurasian Stone Curlew 1 , Black-winged Stilt 2 , Red-wattled Lapwing 40 , Bronze-winged Jacana 4ad , Collared Dove 30 , Spotted Dove 8 , Laughing Dove 3 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 12 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 35 , Plum-headed Parakeet 6 , Greater Coucal h+3 , Jungle Owlet 1h , Savanna Nightjar 1 , Alpine Swift 2 , Little Swift 90 , Crested Treeswift 13 , Indian Roller 3 , White-throated Kingfisher 8 , Kingfisher 1 , Green Bee-eater 45 , Hoopoe 1 , Indian Grey Hornbill 2 , Brown-headed Barbet h , Black-rumped Flameback 4 , Common Woodshrike 2 , Long-tailed Shrike 6 , Black-hooded Oriole 4 , Black Drongo 16 , White-bellied Drongo 5 , Rufous Treepie h+12 , Large-billed Crow 1 , Great Tit 2 , Barn Swallow 110 , Wire-tailed Swallow 12 , Red-rumped Swallow 30 , Rufous-tailed Lark 2 , Ashy-crowned Sparrow Lark 1m+1f , Zitting Cisticola 3 , Ashy Prinia 6 , Plain Prinia 8 , Common Tailorbird h+2 , Red-vented Bulbul 60 , Sykes’s Warbler 2 , Sulphur-bellied Warbler 1 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+4 , Lesser Whitethroat 1 , Jungle Babbler 75 , Oriental White-eye h+7 , Common Myna 2 , Orange-headed Thrush 1 , Oriental Magpie Robin 20 , Indian Robin 5 , Black Redstart 8 , Stonechat 2 , Pied Bushchat 7 , Red-breasted Flycatcher 2 , Taiga Flycatcher 5 , Red-breasted/Taiga Flycatcher 7 , Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher 6 , Purple-rumped Sunbird 2m+3f , Purple Sunbird 7 , House Sparrow 15 , Yellow-throated Sparrow 30 , Indian Silverbill 1 , Grey Wagtail 1 , White-browed Wagtail 3 , Olive-backed Pipit 9. Three-striped Palm Squirrel h+4 , Jungle Cat 1 , Ruddy Mongoose 2 , Southern Plains Grey Langur 85 , Wild Boar 11 , Northern Red Muntjac 4 , Sambar 25 , Chital 80 , Gaur 14. Mugger Crocodile 4.
6/2
Morning game drive – birding around Svasara Jungle Lodge – afternoon game drive.
Tadoba 6.00 – 19.40. Jungle Bush Quail 1 , Red Spurfowl 6 , Grey Junglefowl 4m+2f , Indian Peafowl 30 , Lesser Whistling-duck 45 , Painted Stork 1 , Asian Openbill 1 , Black-headed Ibis 7 , Indian Black Ibis 6 , Indian Pond Heron 6 , Cattle Egret 40 , Grey Heron 1 , Great White Egret 2 , Intermediate Egret 1 , Little Egret 5 , Little Cormorant 30 , Darter 2 , Grey-headed Fish Eagle 1 , Red-headed Vulture 1 , Crested Serpent Eagle 1h , Montagu’s Harrier 1f , Shikra 1m , White-eyed Buzzard 5 , Changeable Hawk Eagle 1 , White-breasted Waterhen 3 , Common Moorhen 1 , Black-winged Stilt 4 , Red-wattled Lapwing 45 , Bronze-winged Jacana 3ad , Common Greenshank 1 , River Tern 1 , Collared Dove 8 , Spotted Dove 55 , Laughing Dove 2 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 22 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 70 , Plum-headed Parakeet 8 , Greater Coucal h+2 , Jungle Owlet 1h , Savanna Nightjar 3 , Little Swift 40 , Crested Treeswift 7 , Indian Roller 6 , White-throated Kingfisher 5 , Pied Kingfisher 1 , Green Bee-eater 80 , Hoopoe 1 , Indian Grey Hornbill 3 , Brown-headed Barbet h , Coppersmith Barbet h , Brown-capped Woodpecker 1 , Yellow-crowned Woodpecker 1 , Black-rumped Flameback 7 , Indian Pitta 1 , Common Woodshrike 1 , Large Cuckoo-shrike 1 , Long-tailed Shrike 6 , Black-hooded Oriole 2 , Black Drongo 20 , White-bellied Drongo 5 , Greater Racket-tailed Drongo 3 , Rufous Treepie h+18 , Large-billed Crow 6 , Barn Swallow 150 , Red-rumped Swallow 35 , Rufous-tailed Lark 1 , Ashy-crowned Sparrow Lark 1m , Zitting Cisticola 2 , Ashy Prinia 3 , Plain Prinia 7 , Common Tailorbird h , Red-vented Bulbul 85 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+6 , Large Grey Babbler 2 , Jungle Babbler 65 , Oriental White-eye h+6 , Common Myna 3, Orange-headed Thrush 9 , Oriental Magpie Robin 25 , Indian Robin 2m , Black Redstart 1m+1f , Stonechat 2 , Pied Bushchat 2m+1f , Taiga Flycatcher 3 , Red-breasted/Taiga Flycatcher 3 , Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher 2 , Blue-winged Leafbird 5 , Purple-rumped Sunbird 1m+3f , Purple Sunbird 6m+3f , House Sparrow 20 , Yellow-throated Sparrow 55 , Red Avadavat 8 , Indian Silverbill 3 , White-browed Wagtail 6 , Paddyfield Pipit 3 , Olive-backed Pipit 7. Bat sp. 4 , Indian Hare 1 , Three-striped Palm Squirrel h+6 , Leopard 1f , Tiger 1f+3imm , Indian Grey Mongoose 2 , Ruddy Mongoose 4 , Southern Plains Grey Langur 40 , Wild Boar 7 , Northern Red Muntjac 5 , Sambar 21 , Chital 110 , Nilgai 1m , Four-horned Antelope 1m , Gaur 17. Mugger Crocodile 2.
7/2
Morning game drive – birding around Chava Resort and Svasara Jungle Lodge – afternoon game drive.
Tadoba 5.55 – 18.25. Red Spurfowl 2 , Grey Junglefowl 3m+1f , Indian Peafowl 23 , Asian Openbill 3 , Woolly-necked Stork 1 , Black-headed Ibis 2 , Indian Black Ibis 6 , Indian Pond Heron 3 , Cattle Egret 30 , Great White Egret 7 , Intermediate Egret 3 , Little Egret 9 , Little Cormorant 35 , Darter 5 , Oriental Honey Buzzard 1 , Black-winged Kite 3 , Short-toed Eagle 1 , Crested Serpent Eagle 2 , Shikra 1 , White-eyed Buzzard 2 , Purple Swamphen 3 , Black-winged Stilt 2 , Red-wattled Lapwing 20 , Bronze-winged Jacana 4ad , Collared Dove 8 , Spotted Dove 35 , Laughing Dove 10 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 8 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 50 , Plum-headed Parakeet 12 , Greater Coucal 1 , Indian Nightjar 1h , Little Swift 3 , Crested Treeswift 2 , Indian Roller 2 , White-throated Kingfisher 4 , Green Bee-eater 40, Hoopoe 1 , Black-rumped Flameback 3 , Long-tailed Shrike 3 , Black-hooded Oriole h , Black Drongo 17 , White-bellied Drongo 2 , Greater Racket-tailed Drongo 1 , White-browed Fantail 1 , Black-naped Monarch 1 , Rufous Treepie h+13, House Crow 15 , Large-billed Crow 6 , Barn Swallow 90 , Wire-tailed Swallow 6 , Red-rumped Swallow 20 , Ashy Prinia 3 , Plain Prinia 7 , Common Tailorbird h , Red-vented Bulbul 50 , Sulphur-bellied Warbler 1 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+9 , Yellow-eyed Babbler 2 , Jungle Babbler 35 , Oriental White-eye h+16 , Oriental Magpie Robin 8 , Indian Robin 1m , Black Redstart 1m , Stonechat 1m , Pied Bushchat 4m , Red-breasted Flycatcher 1 , Taiga Flycatcher 1 , Red-breasted/Taiga Flycatcher 3 , Purple-rumped Sunbird 1f , Purple Sunbird 3m , House Sparrow 2 , Yellow-throated Sparrow 70 , Red Avadavat 11 , Indian Silverbill 2 , White-rumped Munia 9 , Paddyfield Pipit 1 , Olive-backed Pipit 2. Indian Hare 1 , Three-striped Palm Squirrel h+6 , Leopard 1m , Tiger 1f+3imm , Indian Grey Mongoose 3 , Ruddy Mongoose 1 , Dhole 1m+1f , Southern Plains Grey Langur 110 , Northern Red Muntjac 2 , Sambar 25 , Chital 130 , Gaur 8. Bengal Monitor Lizard 1 , Indian Tree Frog 3 , gecko sp. 2.
8/2
Morning game drive – birding around Svasara Jungle Lodge – transfer to Pench – birding around Tuli Tiger Corridor.
Tadoba 6.15 – 13.40. Grey Junglefowl 1m , Indian Peafowl 20 , Lesser Whistling-duck 35 , Asian Openbill 3 , Black-headed Ibis 3 , Indian Black Ibis 4 , Indian Pond Heron 2 , Cattle Egret 40 , Great White Egret 3 , Intermediate Egret 2 , Little Egret 5 , Little Cormorant 30 , Darter 4 , Oriental Honey Buzzard 1 , Black-winged Kite 1 , Grey-headed Fish Eagle 1 , Crested erpent Eagle 1 , White-eyed Buzzard 3 , Changeable Hawk Eagle 1 , White-breasted Waterhen 1 , Purple Swamphen 2 , Black- inged Stilt 2 , Red-wattled Lapwing 25 , Bronze-winged Jacana 2ad , Collared Dove 20 , Spotted Dove 35 , Laughing Dove 12 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 12 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 30 , Plum-headed Parakeet 20 , Indian Nightjar 1h , Asian Palm Swift 13 , Indian Roller 2 , White-throated Kingfisher 3 , Green Bee-eater 25 , Black-rumped Flameback 2 , Long-tailed Shrike 5 , Black-hooded Oriole 1 , Black Drongo 30 , Black-naped Monarch 1 , Rufous Treepie h+12 , Large-billed Crow 4 , Barn Swallow 95 , Red-rumped Swallow 6 , Rufous-tailed Lark 2 , Ashy-crowned Sparrow Lark 2m+1f , Grey-breasted Prinia 6 , Ashy Prinia 5 , Plain Prinia 8 , Common Tailorbird h , Red-vented Bulbul 100 , White-browed Bulbul 2 , Blyth’s Reed Warbler 1 , Sykes’s Warbler 3 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+2 , Jungle Babbler 45 , Oriental White-eye h+7 , Common Myna 1 , Brahminy Starling 2 , Oriental Magpie Robin 13 , Indian Robin 1m , Black Redstart 1f , Stonechat 1 , Pied Bushchat 14 , Asian Brown Flycatcher 1 , Red-breasted Flycatcher 1 , Taiga Flycatcher 1m , Purple-rumped Sunbird 1m+1f , Purple Sunbird 2m+1f , House Sparrow 5 , Yellow-throated Sparrow 80 , Red Avadavat 9 , Indian Silverbill 8 , Grey Wagtail 1 , White-browed Wagtail 1 , Paddyfield Pipit 1. Ruddy Mongoose 1 , Dhole 1 , Southern Plains Grey Langur 20 , Northern Red Muntjac 1 , Sambar 9 , Chital 45.
Tadoba – Pench 13.40 – 17.00. Indian Pond Heron 3 , Cattle Egret 600 , Purple Heron 1 , Little Cormorant 6 , Black-winged Kite 22 , Short-toed Eagle 1 , White-eyed Buzzard 1 , Red-wattled Lapwing 6 , Bronze-winged Jacana 1ad+1imm , Collared Dove 30 , Laughing Dove 25 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 4 , Indian Roller 25 , White-throated Kingfisher 12 , Green Bee-eater 150 , Hoopoe 1 , Long-tailed Shrike 18 , Black 110 , House Crow 16 , Large-billed Crow 1 , Plain Martin 1 , Barn Swallow 40 , Red-vented Bulbul 25 , Common Myna 45 , Asian Pied Starling 3 , Pied Bushchat 25 , Baya Weaver 250. Southern Plains Grey Langur 11 , Rhesus Monkey 35. Tuli Tiger Corridor 17.00 – 18.55. Black-crowned Night Heron 1-2ad , Indian Pond Heron 5 , Cattle Egret 6 , Little Egret 1 , White-breasted Waterhen 2-3 , Red-wattled Lapwing 2 , Green Sandpiper 2 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 7 , Greater Coucal 2h , Collared Scops Owl 1 , Stork-billed Kingfisher 1 , White-throated Kingfisher 1 , Coppersmith Barbet h+1 , Black Drongo 20 , Rufous Treepie 4 , House Crow 3 , Ashy Prinia 3 , Plain Prinia 2 , Red-vented Bulbul 25 , Jungle Babbler 17 , Oriental White-eye h , Common Myna 60 , Asian Pied Starling 1 , Oriental Magpie Robin 2m , Indian Silverbill 4 , Grey Wagtail 3 , White-browed Wagtail 1. Bat sp. 5 (at least 2 species) , Indian Flying Fox 14 , Southern Plains Grey Langur 6.
Chequered Keelback 1 , gecko sp. 1.

9/2
Morning game drive – birding around Tuli Tiger Corridor – afternoon game drive – visiting local river bed at dusk.
Pench 6.25 – 19.10 Indian Peafowl 40 , Ruddy Shelduck 4 , Gadwall 8 , Eurasian Wigeon 4m+3f , Spot-billed Duck 2 , Northern Pintail 7m+4f , Common Teal 12 , Little Grebe 2 , Painted Stork 51 , Asian Openbill 1 , Woolly-necked Stork 2 , Indian Black Ibis 6 , Indian Pond Heron 7 , Cattle Egret 45 , Great White Egret 4 , Intermediate Egret 2 , Little Egret 5 , Little Cormorant 7 , Darter 1 , Oriental Honey Buzzard 2 , Indian White-backed Vulture 1 , Indian Vulture 7 , Crested Serpent Eagle 5 , Shikra 1h+1 , White-eyed Buzzard 3 , Changeable Hawk Eagle 1 , Yellow-wattled Lapwing 2 , Red-wattled Lapwing 20 , Little Ringed Plover 3 , Green Sandpiper 3 , Wood Sandpiper 1 , River Tern 2 , Collared Dove 20 , Spotted Dove 35 , Laughing Dove 15 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 6 , Alexandrine Parakeet 8 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 40 , Plum-headed Parakeet 6 , Greater Coucal h+1 , Collared Scops Owl 1 , Mottled Wood Owl 1 , Jungle Owlet 1h+3 , Alpine Swift 3 , Indian Roller 11 , White-throated Kingfisher 8 , Green Bee-eater 25 , Indian Grey Hornbill 9 , Brown-headed Barbet h+4 , Coppersmith Barbet h , Black-rumped Flameback 8 , Common Woodshrike 1 , Large Cuckoo-shrike 4 , Long-tailed Shrike 3 , Black-hooded Oriole h+1 , Black Drongo 30, White-bellied Drongo 3 , Greater Racket-tailed Drongo 4 , Rufous Treepie h+9 , Large-billed Crow 18 , Great Tit 4 , Barn Swallow 30 , Red-rumped Swallow 85 , Ashy Prinia 2 , Common Tailorbird h+1 , Red-vented Bulbul 30 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+9 , Greenish Warbler 1 , Lesser Whitethroat 1 , Jungle Babbler 55 , Oriental White-eye h+2 , Common Myna 30 , Orange-headed Thrush 1 , Oriental Magpie Robin 13 , Indian Robin 1m , Black Redstart 1m+1f , Stonechat 2m+1f , Pied Bushchat 2m+2f , Red-breasted Flycatcher 5 , Red-breasted/Taiga Flycatcher 14 , Blue-winged Leafbird 1m , Purple Sunbird 1m+1f , Yellow-throated Sparrow 65 , Indian Silverbill 4 , Yellow Wagtail 1 , Grey Wagtail 3 , White Wagtail 3 , White-browed Wagtail 4. Three-striped Palm Squirrel h+8 , Indian Giant Flying Squirrel 1-2 , Golden Jackal 3 , Dhole 2 , Southern Plains Grey Langur 90 , Rhesus Monkey 30 , Wild Boar 13 , Sambar 22 , Chital 230 , Nilgai 6.
10/2
Morning game drive – birding around Tuli Tiger Corridor – bird walk and visiting nearby lake outside the reserve – local river bed at dusk.
Pench 6.20 – 19.10.
Grey Francolin 4 , Indian Peafowl 45 , Ruddy Shelduck 2 , Asian Openbill 5 , Indian Black Ibis 3 , Indian Pond Heron 11 , Cattle Egret 30 , Great White Egret 1 , Little Egret 3 , Great Cormorant 11 , Oriental Honey Buzzard 2 , Black-winged Kite 1 , Grey-headed Fish Eagle 3 , Crested Serpent Eagle 2 , Shikra 1m , White-eyed Buzzard 2 , White-breasted Waterhen 1 , Eurasian Stone Curlew 1h , Yellow-wattled Lapwing 4 , Red-wattled Lapwing 18 , Little Ringed Plover 2 , Green Sandpiper 1 , Collared Dove 16 , Spotted Dove 50 , Emerald Dove 1 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 17 , Alexandrine Parakeet 22 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 60 , Plum-headed Parakeet 19 , Greater Coucal h+3 , Collared Scops Owl 1 , Brown Wood Owl 1h , Jungle Owlet 6 , Little Swift 3 , Crested Treeswift 1 , Indian Roller 30 , White-throated Kingfisher 4 , Green Bee-eater 30 , Hoopoe 6 , Indian Grey Hornbill 9 , Brown-headed Barbet h+2 , Coppersmith Barbet h , Black-rumped Flameback 1h+2 , Common Iora 1 , Large Cuckoo-shrike 1 , Bay-backed Shrike 1 , Long-tailed Shrike 1 , Black-hooded Oriole h+3 , Black Drongo 35 , White-bellied Drongo 6 , Greater Racket-tailed Drongo 4 , White-throated Fantail 2 , Black-naped Monarch 1 , Asian Paradise-flycatcher 1m , Rufous Treepie h+14 , Large-billed Crow 17 , Great Tit 11 , Barn Swallow 6 , Red-rumped Swallow 1 , Ashy-crowned Sparrow Lark 1m+2f , Ashy Prinia 12 , Plain Prinia 3 , Common Tailorbird h+1 , Red-vented Bulbul 40 , White-browed Bulbul 1 , Blyth’s Reed Warbler 1 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+13 , Greenish Warbler 2 , Lesser Whitethroat 1 , Jungle Babbler 60 , Oriental White-eye h+9 , Bank Myna 2 , Common Myna 30 , Brahminy Starling 4 , Orange-headed Thrush 2 , Oriental Magpie Robin 25 , Indian Robin 1m , Black Redstart 3m+1f , Stonechat 1f ,Pied Bushchat 3m+4f , Grey Bushchat 1f , Brown Rockchat 1 , Red-breasted Flycatcher 7 , Taiga Flycatcher 4 , Red-breasted/Taiga Flycatcher 8 , Ultramarine Flycatcher 1m , Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher 1 , Purple Sunbird 1m+1f , House Sparrow 9 , Yellow-throated Sparrow 450 , Yellow Wagtail 6 , Grey Wagtail 3 , White Wagtail 4 , White-browed Wagtail 2 , Paddyfield Pipit 3 , Tawny Pipit 2 , Olive-backed Pipit 7. Three-striped Palm Squirrel h+6 , Indian Giant Flying Squirrel 1 , Golden Jackal 2 , Dhole 2ad+7juv , Southern Plains Grey Langur 70 , Rhesus Monkey 8 , Sambar 25 , Chital 220 , Nilgai 3.
11/2
Morning game drive – transfer to Kanha – afternoon bird walk in Kanha TR.
Pench 6.20 – 11.25.
Indian Peafowl 35 , Little Grebe h+1 , Indian Pond Heron 11 , Cattle Egret 30 , Little Cormorant 1 , Oriental Honey Buzzard 2 White-eyed Buzzard 3 , Changeable Hawk Eagle 1 , Eurasian Stone Curlew 1h , Red-wattled Lapwing 8 , Green Sandpiper 1 , Collared Dove h+7 , Spotted Dove 45 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 4 , Alexandrine Parakeet 12 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 30 , Plum-headed Parakeet 9 , Greater Coucal h+2 , Collared Scops Owl 1 , Mottled Wood Owl 1 , Alpine Swift 385 , Crested Treeswift 1 , Indian Roller 16 , White-throated Kingfisher 2 , Green Bee-eater 20 , Hoopoe 3 , Brown-headed Barbet h+2 , Coppersmith Barbet h , Black-rumped Flameback 6 , White-naped Woodpecker 1 , Common Woodshrike 2 , Large Cuckoo-shrike 4 , Black-hooded Oriole h+2 , Black Drongo 35 , White-bellied Drongo 8 , Greater Racket-tailed Drongo 1 , Black-naped Monarch 1 , Rufous Treepie h+20 , Large-billed Crow 16 , Great Tit 4 , Ashy Prinia 6 , Common Tailorbird 2 , Red-vented Bulbul 40 , Tickell’s Leaf Warbler 2 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+5 , Greenish Warbler 1 , Jungle Babbler 75 , Oriental White-eye h+13 , Common Myna 20 , Orange-headed Thrush 1 , Oriental Magpie Robin 15 , Black Redstart 1m , Pied Bushchat 2m , Red-breasted Flycatcher 4 , Taiga Flycatcher 3 , Red-breasted/Taiga Flycatcher 7 , Golden-fronted Leafbird 3m+2f , House Sparrow 7 , Yellow-throated Sparrow 200 , White-browed Wagtail 2. Three-striped Palm Squirrel h+2 , Tiger 1f , Southern Plains Grey Langur 90 , Rhesus Monkey 17 , Sambar 12 , Chital 220 , Nilgai 5 , Gaur 4. Pench – Kanha 11.25 – 15.00 Asian Openbill 1 , Indian Pond Heron 7 , Cattle Egret 175 , egret sp. 15 , Great Cormorant 90 , Oriental Honey Buzzard 2 , Black-winged Kite 19 , Black Kite 6 , White-eyed Buzzard 1 , Red-wattled Lapwing 30 , Spotted Dove 16 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 30 , Indian Roller 35 , White-throated Kingfisher 4 , Green Bee-eater 18 , Long-tailed Shrike 1 , Black Drongo 40 , Barn Swallow 20 , Wire-tailed Swallow 7 , Red-vented Bulbul 13 , Common Myna 80 , Asian Pied Starling 1 , Oriental Magpie Robin 9 , Pied Bushchat 2m , Purple Sunbird 2m , House Sparrow 11 , Yellow-throated Sparrow 30 , White-browed Wagtail 1. Indian Flying Fox 450 , Rhesus Monkey 35. Kanha 15.10 – 19.10. Indian Black Ibis 5 , Cattle Egret 19 , Red-headed Vulture 1 , Shikra 1f , Eurasian Stone Curlew 1h , Red-wattled Lapwing 3 , Green Sandpiper 1 , Collared Dove 2 , Spotted Dove 6 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 1 , Alexandrine Parakeet 3 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 14 , Plum-headed Parakeet 1 , Common Hawk-cuckoo 1h , Greater Coucal h+1 , Indian Roller 4 , Green Bee-eater 9 , Brown-headed Barbet h+1 , Coppersmith Barbet h , Streak-throated Woodpecker 1 , Black-rumped Flameback 2 , Golden Oriole 1m , Black-hooded Oriole h+2 , Hair-crested Drongo 1 , Greater Racket-tailed Drongo 2 , Black-naped Monarch 1 , Rufous Treepie h+6 , Large-billed Crow 17 , Great Tit 2 , Ashy Prinia 3 , Common Tailorbird h+1 , Red-vented Bulbul 9 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+2 , Greenish Warbler 1 , Jungle Babbler 14 , Oriental White-eye h+8 , Common Myna 7 , Oriental Magpie Robin 8 , Verditer Flycatcher 1. Northern Plains Grey Langur 17 , Wild Boar 1 , Northern Red Muntjac 1 , Chital 18.
12/2
Morning game drive – birding around Tuli Tiger Resort and surroundings – afternoon game drive – evening drive outside the park.
Kanha 6.30 – 20.35. Red Spurfowl 2 , Red Junglefowl h+2m , Indian Peafowl 25 , Gadwall 8 , Eurasian Wigeon 3m+2f , Northern Pintail 35 , Common Teal 9 , Little Grebe 3 , Asian Openbill 1 , Woolly-necked Stork 1 , Lesser Adjudant 1 , Indian Black Ibis 7 , Indian Pond Heron 12 , Cattle Egret 20 , Great White Egret 1 , Intermediate Egret 2 , Little Cormorant 6 , Common Kestrel 1f , Oriental Honey Buzzard 1 , Black-winged Kite 1 , Grey-headed Fish Eagle 1 , Indian Vulture 3 , Crested Serpent Eagle 2 , Shikra 1m , Eurasian Stone Curlew 1-2h , Red-wattled Lapwing 22 , Common/Pintail Snipe 9 , Green Sandpiper 2 , Oriental Turtle Dove 11 , Spotted Dove 8 , Emerald Dove 1 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 4 , Alexandrine Parakeet 4 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 26 , Plum-headed Parakeet 3 , Common Hawk-cuckoo 6h+1 , Asian Koel 1m+1f , Sirkeer Malkoha 1 , Greater Coucal h+2 , Jungle Owlet 2h+3 , Indian Nightjar 1h , Alpine Swift 1 , Crested Treeswift 3 , Indian Roller 8 , White-throated Kingfisher 3 , Kingfisher 1m+2f , Green Bee-eater 20 , Hoopoe 4 , Indian Grey Hornbill 19 , Brown-headed Barbet h+4 , Coppersmith Barbet h+2 , Brown-capped Woodpecker 1 , Rufous Woodpecker 2 , Black-rumped Flameback 9 , White-naped Woodpecker 1 , Common Iora 1 , Large Cuckoo-shrike 3 , Small Minivet 1m , Scarlet Minivet 1m+2f , Brown Shrike 2 , Golden Oriole 1m , Black-hooded Oriole h+4 , Black Drongo 23 , Hair-crested Drongo 1 , Greater Racket-tailed Drongo 4 , Black-naped Monarch 2 , Rufous Treepie h+9 , Large-billed Crow 30 , Great Tit 3 , Barn Swallow 20 , Red-rumped Swallow 13 , Zitting Cisticola 3 , Common Tailorbird h+8 , Red-vented Bulbul 35 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+18 , Greenish Warbler 3 , Jungle Babbler 85 , Brown-cheeked Fulvetta h+5 , Oriental White-eye h+8 , Velvet-fronted Nuthatch 2 , Common Myna 18 , Orange-headed Thrush 1 , Tickell’s Thrush 4m+5f , Oriental Magpie Robin 17 , White-rumped Shama 1m , Red-breasted/Taiga Flycatcher 2 , Verditer Flycatcher 1 , Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher 1 , leafbird sp. 3 , Purple Sunbird 2m , House Sparrow 7 , Yellow Wagtail 1 , Grey Wagtail 3 , Paddyfield Pipit 5 , Olive-backed Pipit 6. Indian Hare 4 , Three-striped Palm Squirrel h+2 , Indian Giant Flying Squirrel 3 , Ruddy Mongoose 2 , Golden Jackal 3 , Northern Plains Grey Langur 45 , Rhesus Monkey 8 , Wild Boar 7 , Northern Red Muntjac 2 , Barasingha 11 , Sambar 14 , Chital 85 , Gaur 9. Indian Flapshell Turtle 25.
13/2
Morning game drive – birding around Tuli Tiger Resort – afternoon game drive – evening drive outside the park.
Kanha 6.10 – 23.10.
Red Spurfowl 1 , Red Junglefowl h , Indian Peafowl 45 , Little Grebe 1h , Black Stork 1 , Woolly-necked Stork 1 , Lesser Adjudant 2 , Indian Black Ibis 4 , Indian Pond Heron 7 , Cattle Egret 25 , Intermediate Egret 2 , Little Cormorant 3 , Oriental Honey Buzzard 2 , Black-winged Kite 1ad+1imm , Indian Vulture 1ad+1imm , Crested Serpent Eagle 2 , Shikra 1 , ufous-bellied Hawk Eagle 1ad , Changeable Hawk Eagle 1 , Yellow-wattled Lapwing 3 , Red-wattled Lapwing 14 , Green Sandpiper 2 , River Tern 17 , Spotted Dove 16 , Emerald Dove 1 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 5 , Alexandrine Parakeet 4 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 30 , Plum-headed Parakeet 6 , Common Hawk-cuckoo 7h , Greater Coucal h , Jungle Owlet 2 , Indian Nightjar 1h+1 , Crested Treeswift 1 , Indian Roller 7 , White-throated Kingfisher 4 , Kingfisher 1f+1 , Green Bee-eater 40 , Hoopoe 1 , Indian Grey Hornbill 13 , Malabar Pied Hornbill h+1 , Brown-headed Barbet h+3 , Coppersmith Barbet h+2 , Brown-capped Woodpecker 1 , Black-rumped Flameback 4 , Common Iora 1 , Large Cuckoo-shrike 12 , Scarlet Minivet 2m+3f , Brown Shrike 1 , Golden Oriole 2m+1 , Black-hooded Oriole h+8 , Black Drongo 9 , Greater Racket-tailed Drongo 6 , Rufous Treepie h+11 , Large-billed Crow 20 , Great Tit 3 , Barn Swallow 9 , Red-rumped Swallow 35 , Zitting Cisticola 2 , Grey-breasted Prinia 1 , Ashy Prinia 13 , Common Tailorbird h+8 , Red-vented Bulbul 25 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+45 , Greenish Warbler 3 , Indian Scimitar Babbler h , Jungle Babbler 50 , Brown-cheeked Fulvetta h+9 , Oriental White-eye h+14 , Velvet-fronted Nuthatch 1 , Common Myna 6 , Oriental Magpie Robin 25 ,White-rumped Shama 3m , Black Redstart 3f , Stonechat 1m , Taiga Flycatcher 1 , Red-breasted/Taiga Flycatcher 2 , Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher 3 , Purple Sunbird 3m+1f , House Sparrow 10 , Yellow-throated Sparrow 12 , White-rumped Munia 3 , Grey Wagtail 4 , Olive-backed Pipit 7 , pipit sp. 25. Indian Hare 1 , Three-striped Palm Squirrel h+3 , Indian Giant Flying Squirrel 2 , Common Palm Civet 1 , Leopard 1h , Golden Jackal 2 , Northern Plains Grey Langur 110 , Wild Boar 12 , Northern Red Muntjac 1h , Barasingha 22 , Sambar 13 , Chital 90 , Gaur 4. Indian Flapshell Turtle 15.
14/2
Morning game drive – birding around Tuli Tiger Resort – afternoon game drive – transfer to Nagpur catching late flight.
Kanha 6.30 – 18.00.
Red Junglefowl h+8 , Indian Peafowl 30 , Lesser Whistling-duck 35 , Northern Pintail 3m+4f , Little Grebe 1h , Woolly-necked Stork 1 , Indian Black Ibis 6 , Indian Pond Heron 7 , Cattle Egret 35 , Intermediate Egret 2 , Little Egret 2 , Little Cormorant 4 , Oriental Honey Buzzard 3 , Indian White-backed Vulture 2 , Indian Vulture 2 on nest + 17 , Crested Serpent Eagle 2 , Changeable Hawk Eagle 1 , Red-wattled Lapwing 19 , Green Sandpiper 1 , Spotted Dove 18 , Yellow-footed Green Pigeon 11 , Alexandrine Parakeet 2 , Rose-ringed Parakeet 40 , Plum-headed Parakeet 20 , Common Hawk-cuckoo 4h , Asian Koel 1m , Greater Coucal h , Jungle Owlet 1 , White-rumped Spinetail 2 , Alpine Swift 16 , Crested Treeswift 4 , Indian Roller 13 , White-throated Kingfisher 2 , Green Bee-eater 25 , Hoopoe 2 , Indian Grey Hornbill 16 , Brown-headed Barbet h+4 , Coppersmith Barbet h+2 , Black-rumped Flameback 4 , Large Cuckoo-shrike 3 , Brown Shrike 2 , Long-tailed Shrike 2 , Golden Oriole 1f , Black-hooded Oriole h+2 , Black Drongo 6 , Ashy Drongo 1 , Greater Racket-tailed Drongo 7 , Rufous Treepie h+14 , Large-billed Crow 16 , Great Tit 2 , Barn Swallow 7 , Red-rumped Swallow 65 , Zitting Cisticola 1 , Jungle Prinia 1 , Ashy Prinia 20 , Plain Prinia 4 , Common Tailorbird h+7 , Red-vented Bulbul 35 , Hume’s Leaf Warbler h+9 , Greenish Warbler 2 , Puff-throated Babbler 1 , Jungle Babbler 65 , Oriental White-eye h+11 , Common Myna 8, White-tailed Rubythroat 1m , Oriental Magpie Robin 16 , White-rumped Shama 1h , Stonechat 1 , Taiga Flycatcher 2 , Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher 1 , leafbird sp. 1 , Purple Sunbird 3m , House Sparrow 10 , Yellow-throated Sparrow 6 , Paddyfield Pipit 1 , Olive-backed Pipit 2. Three-striped Palm Squirrel h+1 , Tiger h , Ruddy Mongoose 2 , Golden Jackal 2 , Northern Plains Grey Langur 90 , Wild Boar 24 , Barasingha 16 , Sambar 11 , Chital 145 , Gaur 9.

Photos.

All photos in this report is taken by either of us on this actual trip. Page 4: The Tigress, Maya, with 2 of her 3 cubs – Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve. Page 8: Indian Roller, Purple-rumped Sunbird, Dhole, Tiger and Chitals – Tadoba. Page 13: Oriental Honey Buzzard, Jungle Owlet, Indian Peafowl, Mottled Owl, Gaur, Collared Scops Owl and Golden Jackal – Pench. Page 19: Orange-headed Thrush, Gaurs, Barasingha, White-tailed Rubythroat, Chitals, Indian Giant Flying Squirrel and Rufous- ellied Hawk Eagle – Kanha. Page 25: Leopard – Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve. Page 28: Chital, Northern Red Muntjac, Changeable Hawk Eagle, Dhole and Red Junglefowl – Tadoba-Andhari, Pench and Kanha Tiger Reserves.

Bird List.

Grey Francolin (Francolinus pondicerianus
– 10/2 4 Pench.
Jungle Bush Quail(Perdicula asiatica)
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Red Spurfowl (Galloperdix spadicea)
– 5/2 2 ; 6/2 6 ; 7/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 12/2 2 ; 13/2 1 Kanha TR.
Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus)
– 12/2 h+2m ; 13/2 h ; 14/2 h+8 Kanha TR.
Grey Junglefowl (Gallus sonneratii )
– 5/2 9m+7f ; 6/2 4m+2f ; 7/2 3m+1f ; 8/2 1m Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus)
– Surprisingly almost only seen in the reserves where abundant.
Lesser Whistling-duck (Dendrocygna javanica)
– 5/2 6 ; 6/2 45 ; 8/2 35 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 14/2 35 Kanha TR.
Ruddy Shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea)
– 9/2 4 ; 10/2 2 Pench TR.
Gadwall (Anas strepera)
– 9/2 8 Pench TR.
– 12/2 8 Kanha TR.
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
– 9/2 4m+3f Pench TR.
– 12/2 3m+2f Kanha TR.
Spot-billed Duck (Anas poecilorhyncha)
– 9/2 2 Pench TR.
Black-crowned Night Heron(Nycticorax nycticorax)
– 8/2 1-2ad Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
Indian Pond Heron (Ardeola grayii )
– Seen daily in small numbers. Highest count was 12 in Kanha TR on the 12th.
Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis)
– Seen in abundance everywhere.
Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea)
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea)
– 8/2 1 Tadoba – Pench.
Great White Egret (Casmerodius albus)
– 6/2 2 ; 7/2 7 ; 8/2 3 Tadoba..
– 9/2 4 ; 10/2 1 Pench.
– 12/2 1 Kanha TR.
Intermediate Egret (Mesophoyx intermedia)
– 5/2 3 ; 6/2 1 ; 7/2 3 ; 8/2 2 Tadoba TR.
– 9/2 2 Pench TR.
– 12/2 2 ; 13/2 2 ; 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Little Egret (Egretta garzetta)
– 5/2 3 ; 6/2 5 ; 7/2 9 ; 8/2 5 Tadoba.
– 8/2 1 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
– 9/2 5 ; 10/2 3 Pench.
– 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Little Cormorant (Phalacrocorax niger)
– Very common. Highest counts in Tadoba, but seen at just about every pool
and lake.
Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo)
– 10/2 11 Pench.
– 11/2 90 Pench – Kanha.
Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus)
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 11/2 1 Kanha TR.
Short-toed Eagle (Circaetus gallicus)
– 5/2 1 ; 7/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 8/2 1 Tadoba – Pench.
Crested Serpent Eagle (Spilornis cheela)
– 5/2 1h+1 ; 6/2 1h ; 7/2 2 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 5 ; 10/2 2 Pench TR.
– 12/2 2 ; 13/2 2 ; 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Montagu’s Harrier (Circus pygargus)
– 6/2 1f Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Shikra (Accipiter badius)
– 5/2 1 ; 6/2 1m ; 7/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 1h+1 ; 10/2 1m Pench.
– 11/2 1f ; 12/2 1m ; 13/2 1 Kanha TR.
White-eyed Buzzard (Butastur teesa)
– 5/2 1 ; 6/2 5 ; 7/2 2 ; 8/2 3 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 8/2 1 Tadoba – Pench.
– 9/2 3 ; 10/2 2 ; 11/2 3 Pench TR.
– 11/2 1 Pench – Kanha.
Rufous-bellied Hawk Eagle (Lophotriorchis kienerii )
– 13/2 1ad Kanha TR.
– This beautiful eagle was seen soaring for several minutes and photos were
taken for documentation (see elsewhere). This low density species might well
be overlooked but according to distribution maps it’s well out of range here in
Kanha TR. A really nice sighting and since it’s normally considered a non
migratory species, this adult bird could possibly indicate a significant
extension of the species known breeding range?
Common/Pintail Snipe (Gallinago gallinago/stenura
– 12/2 9 Kanha TR.
Common Greenshank (Tringa nebularia)
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus)
– 8/2 2 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
– 9/2 3 ; 10/2 1 ; 11/2 1 Pench.
– 11/2 1 ; 12/2 2 ; 13/2 2 ; 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
Wood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola)
– 9/2 1 Pench TR.
River Tern (Sterna aurantia)
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 2 Pench TR.
– 13/2 17 Kanha TR.
– The 17 birds in Kanha TR were seen together by a small lake just west
of the old Kisli Gate. We passed the lake twice on each of our six game
drives in the reserve but we only saw them here once.
Oriental Turtle Dove (Streptopelia orientalis)
– 12/2 11 Kanha TR.
Collared Dove (Streptopelia decaocto)
– Very common in Tadoba and Pench, but not registered once in Kanha.
Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis)
– Abundant. By far the most common and widespread dove on this trip.
Laughing Dove (Streptopelia senegalensis)
– Only registered in Tadoba and Pench where fairly common.
However, almost exclusively seen outside the parks.
Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps indica)
– 10/2 1 Pench.
– 12/2 1 ; 13/2 1 Kanha TR.
Brown Wood Owl (Strix leptogrammica)
– 10/2 1h Pench.
– Heard briefly but well in the middle of the day at the dried out
river bed approximately one kilometer east of Turia Gate.
Jungle Owlet (Glaucidium radiatum)
– 5/2 1h ; 6/2 1h Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 1h+3 ; 10/2 6 Pench.
– 12/2 2h+3 ; 13/2 2 ; 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
Indian Nightjar (Caprimulgus asiaticus)
– 7/1 1h ; 8/2 1h Tadoba.
– 12/2 1h ; 13/2 1h+1 Kanha.
Savanna Nightjar (Caprimulgus affinis)
– 5/2 1 ; 6/2 3 Tadoba.
White-rumped Spinetail (Zoonavena sylvatica)
– 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Asian Palm Swift (Cypsiurus balasiensis)
– 8/2 13 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– Appropriately seen whizzing around what seemed to be just about the
only palm tree in the entire park.
Alpine Swift (Tachymarptis melba)
– 5/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 3 ; 11/2 385 Pench TR.
– 12/2 1 ; 14/2 16 Kanha TR.
– Quite an impressive sight seeing such a large number of Alpine Swifts
feeding high above the canopy in Pench TR on the 11th. Furthermore it’s
probably rather unusual seeing so many this time of year in Central India.
We certainly haven’t come across similar numbers reading other reports
from the area
Little Swift (Apus affinis)
– 5/2 90 ; 6/2 40 ; 7/3 3 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 10/2 3 Pench.
Northern Pintail (Anas acuta)
– 9/2 7m+4f Pench TR.
– 12/2 35 ; 14/2 3m+4f Kanha TR.
Common Teal (Anas crecca)
– 9/2 12 Pench TR.
– 12/2 9 Kanha TR.
Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis)
– 9/2 2 ; 11/2 h+1 Pench TR.
– 12/2 3 ; 13/2 1h ; 14/2 1h Kanha TR.
Painted Stork (Mycteria leucocephala
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 51 Pench TR.
Asian Openbill (Anastomus oscitans)
– 5/2 2 ; 6/2 1 ; 7/2 3 ; 8/2 3 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 1 ; 10/2 5 Pench.
– 11/2 1 Pench – Kanha.
– 12/2 1 Kanha TR.
Black Stork (Ciconia nigra)
– 13/2 1 Kanha TR.
Woolly-necked Stork (Ciconia episcopus)
– 7/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 2 Pench TR.
– 12/2 1 ; 13/2 1 ; 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
Lesser Adjudant (Leptoptilos javanicus)
– 12/2 1 ; 13/2 2 Kanha TR.
Black-headed Ibis (Threskiornis melanocephalus
– 5/2 5 ; 6/2 7 ; 7/2 2 ; 8/2 3 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Indian Black Ibis (Pseudibis papillosa)
– Fairly common everywhere.
Darter (Anhinga melanogaster)
– 5/2 3 ; 6/2 2 ; 7/2 5 ; 8/2 4 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 1 Pench TR.
Common Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus)
– 12/2 1f Kanha.
Oriental Honey Buzzard (Pernis ptilorhynchus)
– 5/2 2 ; 7/2 1 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 2 ; 10/2 2 ; 11/2 2 Pench TR.
– 11/2 2 Pench – Kanha.
– 12/2 1 ; 13/2 2 ; 14/2 3 Kanha TR.
Black-winged Kite (Elanus cearuleus)
– 5/2 2 ; 7/2 3 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba.
– 8/2 22 Tadoba – Pench.
– 10/2 1 Pench TR.
– 11/2 19 Pench – Kanha.
– 12/2 1 ; 13/2 1ad+1imm Kanha TR.
Black Kite (Milvus migrans)
– 11/2 6 Pench – Kanha.
Grey-headed Fish Eagle (Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus)
– 6/2 1 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 10/2 3 Pench.
– 12/2 1 Kanha TR.
Indian White-backed Vulture (Gyps bengalensis)
– 9/2 1 Pench TR.
– 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Indian Vulture (Gyps indicus)
– 9/2 7 Pench TR.
– 12/2 3 ; 13/2 1ad+1imm ; 14/2 19 Kanha TR.
– The record from Kanha TR on the 14th includes two birds sitting on their nest.
Changeable Hawk Eagle (Spizaetus cirrhatus)
– 6/2 1 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 1 ; 11/2 1 Pench TR.
– 13/2 1 ; 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
– If split this is Crested Hawk Eagle (Spizaetus cirrhatus)
White-breasted Waterhen (Amaurornis phoenicurus)
– 6/2 3 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 8/2 2-3 ; 10/2 1 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio)
– 7/2 3 ; 8/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– Same birds on both dates.
Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus)
– 5/2 1 ; 6/2 1 Tadoba-andhari TR.
Eurasian Stone Curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus)
– 5/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 10/2 1h ; 11/2 1h Pench.
– 11/2 1h ; 12/2 1-2h Kanha TR.
Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus)
– 5/2 2 ; 6/2 4 ; 7/2 2 ; 8/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Yellow-wattled Lapwing (Vanellus malabaricus)
– 9/2 2 ; 10/2 4 Pench TR.
– 13/2 3 Kanha TR.
Red-wattled Lapwing (Vanellus indicus)
– Very common and widespread
Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius)
– 9/2 3 ; 10/2 2 Pench.
Bronze-winged Jacana (Metopidius indicus)
– 5/2 4ad ; 6/2 3ad ; 7/2 4ad , 8/2 2ad Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 8/2 1ad+1imm Tadoba – Pench.
Yellow-footed Green Pigeon (Treron phoenicopterus)
– 5/2 12 ; 6/2 22 ; 7/2 8 ; 8/2 12 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 6 ; 10/2 17 ; 11/2 4 Pench.
– 11/2 1 ; 12/2 4 ; 13/2 5 ; 14/2 11 Kanha TR.
Alexandrine Parakeet (Psittacula eupatria)
– 9/2 8 ; 10/2 22 ; 11/2 12 Pench TR.
– 11/2 3 ; 12/2 4 ; 13/2 4 ; 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Rose-ringed Parakeet (Psittacula krameri )
– Abundant everywhere.
Plum-headed Parakeet (Psittacula cyanocephala)
– Common and widespread, though mostly seen in the three parks.
Common Hawk-cuckoo (Hierococcyx varius)
– 11/2 1h ; 12/2 6h+1 ; 13/2 7h ; 14/2 4h Kanha.
Asian Koel (Eudynamys scolopacea
– 12/2 1m+1f ; 14/2 1m Tuli Tiger Resort, Kanha.
Sirkeer Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus leschenaultii )
– 12/2 1 Kanha TR.
Greater Coucal (Centropus [sinensis] parroti
– Seen in low numbers in all three parks, but much more often heard.
– If split this is Southern Coucal (Centropus parroti )
Collared Scops Owl (Otus bakkamoena)
– 8/2 1 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
– 9/2 1 ; 10/2 1 ; 11/2 1 Pench TR.
– If split this is Indian Scops Owl (Otus bakkamoena)
Mottled Wood Owl (Strix ocellata)
– 9/2 1 ; 11/2 1 Pench TR.
– These two different individuals were both seen extremely well.
Crested Treeswift (Hemiprocne coronata)
– 5/2 13 ; 6/2 7 ; 7/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 10/2 1 ; 11/2 1 Pench TR.
– 12/2 3 ; 13/2 1 ; 14/2 4 Kanha TR.
Indian Roller (Coracias benghalensis)
– Very common everywhere. Highest numbers seen from the car driving
between the parks.
Stork-billed Kingfisher (Halcyon capensis)
– 8/2 1 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
– Seen very well by one of the lakes on the lodge grounds. Later flying
in to its night roost in the dense thicket.
White-throated Kingfisher (Halcyon smyrnensis)
– A solitary but extremely widespread species, which we saw
daily in fair numbers.
Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis)
– 5/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 12/2 1m+2f ; 13/2 1f+1 Kanha TR.
Pied Kingfisher (Ceryle rudis)
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Green Bee-eater (Merops orientalis)
– This late riser certainly doesn’t “get the worm”, but it seems to
do allright non the less. Abundant everywhere.
Hoopoe (Upupa epops)
– A low density species but seen almost daily.
Indian Grey Hornbill (Ocyceros birostris)
– 5/2 2 ; 6/2 3 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 9 ; 10/2 9 Pench TR.
– 12/2 19 ; 13/2 13 ; 14/2 16 Kanha TR.

Malabar Pied Hornbill (Anthracoceros coronatus)
– 13/2 h+1 Kanha TR.
Brown-headed Barbet (Megalaima zeylanica)
– Like the next species much more often heard than seen. We managed to
see both on several occasions, though, and they seemed increasingly common
going from Tadoba to Pench to Kanha.
Coppersmith Barbet (Megalaima haemacephala)
– See comment above.
Brown-capped Woodpecker (Dendrocopos [moluccensis] nanus)
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 12/2 1 ; 13/2 1 Kanha TR.
Yellow-crowned Woodpecker (Dendrocopos mahrattensis)
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Rufous Woodpecker (Celeus brachyurus)
– 12/2 2 Kanha.
– Seen together on the opposite side of the river from Tuli Tiger Resort,
on our midday walk.
Streak-throated Woodpecker (Picus xanthopygaeus)
– 11/2 1 Kanha TR.
Black-rumped Flameback (Dinopium benghalense)
– Common in all three parks.
White-naped Woodpecker (Chrysocolaptes festivus)
– 11/2 1 Pench TR.
– 12/2 1 Kanha TR.
Indian Pitta (Pitta brachyura)
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– Seen from the car on the paved “mainroad” approximately half way
between Lake Tadoba and Lake Telia. Somewhat of a surprise to us, since
we were expecting it to be further south this time of year. However,
Golden Oriole (Oriolus [oriolus] kundoo) Asian Paradise-flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi )
– 11/2 1m ; 12/2 1m ; 13/2 2m+1f , 14/2 1f Kanha TR.
– If split this is Indian Golden Oriole (Oriolus kundoo)
Black-hooded Oriole (Oriolus xanthornus)
– Commonly seen and heard in all three parks but no doubt more numerous
in Pench and Kanha.
Black Drongo (Dicrurus macrocercus)
– Abundant. Among the most numerous and widespread species of the trip.
There might have been one or two Ashy Drongos “hidding” between them.
Ashy Drongo (Dicrurus leucophaeus)
– 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
White-bellied Drongo (Dicrurus caerulescens)
– 5/2 5 ; 6/2 5 ; 7/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 3 ; 10/2 6 ; 11/2 8 Pench TR.
Hair-crested Drongo (Dicrurus hottentottus)
– 11/2 1 ; 12/2 1 Kanha TR.
Greater Racket-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus paradiseus)
– 6/2 3 ; 7/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 4 ; 10/2 4 ; 11/2 1 Pench TR.
– 11/2 2 ; 12/2 4 ; 13/2 6 ; 14/2 7 Kanha TR.
White-throated Fantail (Rhipidura [albicollis] albogularis)
– 10/2 2 Pench.
– If split this is White-spotted Fantail (Rhipidura albogularis)
White-browed Fantail (Rhipidura aureola)
– 7/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Black-naped Monarch (Hypothymis azurea)
– 7/2 1 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 10/2 1 ; 11/2 1 Pench.
– 11/2 1 ; 12/2 2 Kanha TR.
Ashy-crowned Sparrow Lark(Eremopterix griseus)
– 5/2 1m+1f ; 6/2 1m ; 8/2 2m+1f Tadoba.
– 10/2 1m+2f Pench.
Zitting Cisticola (Cisticola juncidis)
– 5/2 3 ; 6/2 2 Tadoba.
– 12/2 3 ; 13/2 2 ; 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
Grey-breasted Prinia (Prinia hodgsonii )
– 8/2 6 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 13/2 1 Kanha TR.
Jungle Prinia (Prinia sylvatica)
– 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
Ashy Prinia (Prinia socialis)
– Common everywhere.
Plain Prinia (Prinia inornata)
– 5/2 8 ; 6/2 7 ; 7/2 7 ; 8/2 8 Tadoba.
– 8/2 2 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
– 10/2 3 Pench.
– 14/2 4 Kanha.
Common Tailorbird (Orthotomus sutorius)
– Heard and seen in fair numbers in and around all three parks.
Red-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer)
– Abundant. Seen all over and easily one of the most common species
of the trip.
White-browed Bulbul (Pycnonotus luteolus)
– 8/2 2 Svasara Jungle Lodge, Tadoba.
– 10/2 1 Pench.
Blyth’s Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus dumetorum)
– 8/2 1 Svasara Jungle Lodge, Tadoba.
– 10/2 1 Pench.
Brown-cheeked Fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala)
– 12/2 h+5 ; 13/2 h+9 Kanha TR.
Oriental White-eye (Zosterops palpebrosus)
– Common in and around all three parks. More often heard than seen, though.
Velvet-fronted Nuthatch (Sitta frontalis)
– 12/2 2 ; 13/1 1 Kanha TR.
Bank Myna (Acridotheres ginginianus)
– 10/2 2 Pench.
Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis)
– Surprisingly few seen around Tadoba but common everywhere else.
Asian Pied Starling (Sturnus contra)
– 8/2 3 Tadoba – Pench.
– 8/2 1 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
– 11/2 1 Pench – Kanha.
Brahminy Starling (Sturnus pagodarum)
– 8/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 10/2 4 Pench.
Orange-headed Thrush (Zoothera citrina)
– 5/2 1 ; 6/2 9 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 1 ; 10/2 2 ; 11/2 1 Pench TR.
– 12/2 1 Tuli Tiger Resort, Kanha.
Tickell’s Thrush (Turdus unicolor)
– 12/2 2f Kanha TR.
– 12/2 4m+3f Tuli Tiger Resort, Kanha.
White-tailed Rubythroat (Luscinia pectoralis)
– 14/2 1m Kanha TR.
– According to distribution maps, this bird was way out of range. However, this
is not a first for Kanha TR, and it’s probably fair to assume that the species
is overlooked south of it’s presumed winter quarters on the subcontinent
Asian Brown Flycatcher (Muscicapa dauurica)
– 8/2 1 Svasara Jungle Lodge, Tadoba.
Red-breasted Flycatcher (Ficedula parva)
– 5/2 2 ; 7/2 1 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba.
– 9/2 5 ; 10/2 7 ; 11/2 4 Pench.
Taiga Flycatcher (Ficedula albicilla)
– 5/2 5 ; 6/2 3 ; 7/2 1 ; 8/2 1m Tadoba.
– 10/2 4 ; 11/2 3 Pench.
– 13/2 1 ; 14/2 2 Kanha.
– In addition quite a few unidentified Red-breasted/Taiga Flycatchers
were seen, especially in Tadoba and Pench.
Ultramarine Flycatcher (Ficedula superciliaris)
– 10/2 1m Pench.
Verditer Flycatcher (Eumyias thalassinus)
– 11/2 1 ; 12/2 1 Kanha TR.
Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher (Cyornis tickelliae)
– 5/2 6 ; 6/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 10/2 1 Pench.
– 13/2 3 ; 14/2 1 Kanha.
Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher (Culicicapa ceylonensis)
– 12/2 1 Kanha TR.
Blue-winged Leafbird (Chloropsis [cochinchinensis] jerdoni )
– 6/2 5 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 1m Pench TR.
– If split this is Jerdon’s Leafbird (Chloropsis jerdoni )
Golden-fronted Leafbird (Chloropsis aurifrons)
– 11/2 3ad+2imm Pench TR.
Purple-rumped Sunbird (Leptocoma zeylonica)
– 5/2 2m+3f ; 6/2 1m+3f ; 7/2 1f ; 8/2 1m+1f Tadoba.
White-browed Wagtail (Motacilla maderaspatensis)
– 5/2 3 ; 6/2 6 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 8/2 1 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
– 9/2 4 , 10/2 2 ; 11/2 2 Pench.
– 11/2 1 Pench – Kanha.
Paddyfield Pipit (Anthus rufulus)
– 6/2 3 ; 7/2 1 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba.
– 10/2 3 Pench.
– 12/2 5 ; 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
according to our guide they return to their breeding grounds rather early.
Furthermore Tadoba really isn’t that far from the species winter quarters,
so maybe this particular individual just never made it further south.
Common Woodshrike (Tephrodornis pondicerianus)
– 5/2 2 ; 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 1 ; 11/2 2 Pench TR.
Common Iora (Aegithina tiphia)
– 10/2 1 Pench.
– 12/2 1 ; 13/2 1 Kanha TR.
Large Cuckoo-shrike (Coracina macei )
– 6/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 4 ; 10/2 1 ; 11/2 4 Pench.
– 12/2 3 ; 13/2 12 ; 14/2 3 Kanha TR.
Small Minivet (Pericrocotus cinnamomeus)
– 12/2 1m Kanha TR.
Scarlet Minivet (Pericrocotus flammeus)
– 12/2 1m+2f ; 13/2 2m+3f Kanha TR.
– The male of this species really is mind-blowingly beautiful.
Brown Shrike(Lanius cristatus)
– 12/2 2 ; 13/2 1 ; 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Bay-backed Shrike(Lanius vittatus)
– 10/2 1 Pench.
Long-tailed Shrike (Lanius schach)
– 5/2 6 ; 6/2 6 ; 7/2 3 ; 8/2 5 Tadoba.
– 8/2 18 Tadoba – Pench.
– 9/2 3 ; 10/2 1 Pench.
– 11/2 1 Pench – Kanha
– 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Asian Paradise-flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi )
– 10/2 1m Pench.
Rufous Treepie (Dendrocitta vagabunda)
– Very common in and around all three parks.
House Crow (Corvus splendens)
– 7/2 15 Tadoba.
– 8/2 16 Tadoba – Pench.
– 8/2 3 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
Large-billed Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos)
– Common everywhere, though in relative small numbers around Tadoba.
Great Tit (Parus [major] cinereus)
– 5/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 4 ; 10/2 11 ; 11/2 4 Pench.
– 11/2 2 ; 12/2 3 ; 13/2 3 ; 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
– If split this is Cinereous Tit (Parus cinereus)
Plain Martin (Riparia paludicola)
– 8/2 1 Tadob – Pench.
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)
– Very common everywhere but surprisingly outnumbered by
Red-rumped Swallow in Kanha.
Wire-tailed Swallow (Hirundo smithii )
– 5/2 12 ; 7/2 6 Tadoba.
– 11/2 7 Pench – Kanha.
Red-rumped Swallow (Cecropis daurica)
– Common in and around all three parks.
Rufous-tailed Lark (Ammomanes phoenicura)
– 5/2 2 ; 6/2 1 ; 8/2 2 Tadoba.
Sykes’s Warbler (Iduna rama)
– 5/2 2 ; 8/2 3 Svasara Jungle Lodge, Tadoba.
Tickell’s Leaf Warbler (Phylloscopus affinis)
– 11/2 2 Pench TR.
Sulphur-bellied Warbler (Phylloscopus griseolus)
– 5/2 1 ; 7/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Hume’s Leaf Warbler (Phylloscopus humei )
– Very commonly seen and heard in all three parks, though most
numerous in Kanha TR.
Greenish Warbler (Phylloscopus trochiloides)
– 9/2 1 ; 10/2 2 ; 11/2 1 Pench.
– 11/2 1 ; 12/2 3 ; 13/2 3 ; 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Lesser Whitethroat (Sylvia curruca)
– 5/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 1 ; 10/2 1 Pench.
Puff-throated Babbler (Pellorneum ruficeps)
– 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
Indian Scimitar Babbler (Pomatorhinus horsfieldii )
– 13/2 h Kanha TR.
Yellow-eyed Babbler (Chrysomma sinense)
– 7/2 2 Svasara Jungle Lodge, Tadoba.
Large Grey Babbler (Turdoides malcolmi )
– 6/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Jungle Babbler (Turdoides striata)
– One of the most numerous species encountered on the trip.
Seen just about everywhere.
Oriental Magpie Robin (Copsychus saularis)
– Very common in and around all three parks and lodges.
White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus)
– 12/2 1m ; 13/2 3m ; 14/2 1h Kanha TR.
Indian Robin (Saxicoloides fulicatus)
– 5/2 5 ; 6/2 2m ; 7/2 1m ; 8/2 1m Tadoba.
– 9/2 1m ; 10/2 1m Pench.
Black Redstart (Phoenicurus ochruros)
– 5/2 8 ; 6/2 1m+1f ; 7/2 1m ; 8/2 1f Tadoba.
– 9/2 1m+1f ; 10/2 3m+1f ; 11/2 1m Pench.
– 13/2 3f Kanha TR.
Stonechat (Saxicola torquatus)
– 5/2 2 ; 6/2 2 ; 7/2 1m ; 8/2 1 Tadoba.
– 9/2 2m+1f ; 10/2 1f Pench.
– 13/2 1m ; 14/2 1 Kanha TR.
Pied Bushchat (Saxicola caprata
– 5/2 7 ; 6/2 2m+1f ; 7/2 4m ; 8/2 14 Tadoba.
– 8/2 25 Tadoba – Pench.
– 9/2 2m+2f ; 10/2 3m+4f ; 11/2 2m Pench.
– 11/2 2m Pench – Kanha.
Grey Bushchat (Saxicola ferreus)
– 10/2 1f Pench.
– Seen at a dry river bed approximately one kilometer east of Turia Gate.
Being slightly out of it’s presumed winter range, this was another surprise.
We’ve both seen the species before and managed to take photos for
documentation, though the light was fading quickly when the bird was found.
Brown Rockchat (Cercomela fusca)
– 10/2 1 Pench.
– The bird was sitting on a wall in the village of Turiya. We’re both familiar
with the species, but unfortunately didn’t get any photos for documentation,
since we weren’t aware of the fact that this record is somewhat out of range.
Purple Sunbird (Cinnyris asiaticus)
– Seen pretty much everywhere but never in big numbers.
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)
– Not once seen inside the parks but rather common everywhere else.
Yellow-throated Sparrow (Gymnoris xanthocollis)
– Abundant in Tadoba and Pench, much less common in Kanha.
Baya Weaver (Ploceus philippinus)
– 8/2 250 Tadoba – Pench.
Red Avadavat (Amandava amandava)
– 6/2 8 ; 7/2 11 ; 8/2 9 Tadoba.
Indian Silverbill (Lonchura malabarica)
– 5/2 1 ; 6/2 3 ; 7/2 2 ; 8/2 8 Tadoba.
– 8/2 4 ; 9/2 4 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
White-rumped Munia (Lonchura striata)
– 7/2 9 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 13/2 3 Kanha TR.
Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla flava)
– 9/2 1 ; 10/2 6 Pench.
– 12/2 1 Kanha TR.
Grey Wagtail (Motacilla cinerea)
– 5/2 1 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba.
– 8/2 3 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
– 9/2 3 10/2 3 Pench.
– 12/2 3 ; 13/2 4 Kanha.
White Wagtail (Motacilla alba)
– 9/2 3 ; 10/2 4 Pench.
Tawny Pipit (Anthus campestris)
– 10/2 2 Pench.
Olive-backed Pipit (Anthus hodgsoni )
– 5/2 9 ; 6/2 7 ; 7/2 2 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 10/2 7 Pench TR.
– 12/2 6 ; 13/2 7 ; 14/2 2 Kanha TR.

Mammals

Indian Hare (Lepus nigricollis)
– 6/2 1 ; 7/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 12/2 4 ; 13/2 1 Kanha.
Three-striped Palm Squirrel (Funambulus palmarum)
– Seen and heard rather commonly in all three parks.
– Actually we’re not absolutely sure about the identification
when it comes to The striped palm squirrels. The animals we saw
all looked very similar and most probably belong to the same species.
However, the literature we brought along on the trip wasn’t
particularly helpful when it came to identifying the two species,
and according to the IUCN distribution maps they are both possible
to see in all three parks. Even though the species names suggest
otherwise, the number of stripes down the back don’t seem a certain
distinguishing feature to us, but rather a matter of individual variation.
Compared to the Five-striped Palm Squirrels we’ve both previously seen further north,
the palm squirrels seen on this trip all seemed less richly coloured,
lacking the warm brown- and yellowish tones, or only showing hints of it.
Most other reports only refer to Three-striped Palm Squirrels in the parks
visited and our guide also only ever referred to them as that, but the matter
might deserve more attention.
Indian Giant Flying Squirrel (Petaurista philippensis)
– 9/2 1-2 ; 10/2 1 Pench.
– 12/2 3 ; 13/2 2 Kanha.
– Undoubtedly one of the highlights of the trip was finding this
amazing species on several occasions. The flying squirrel(s) of Pench
wasn’t a major surprise since it has been mentioned in other reports from the
same area outside the park. It was, however, a fantastic experience seeing
them as well as we did at dusk, and we even managed to watch them gliding from tree
to tree a few times. The animals we saw weren’t particularly shy but clearly didn’t
like the light of the torch and never once tried to “fly” when caught in the spotlight.
As a consequence we tried to use the torch as little as possible, and spend
considerable less time with each animal than we would have liked. The total number of
individuals seen was 1-2 in Pench and 4 in Kanha, and they all seemed to prefer
forest edges or mature forest with good spacing between the trees.
In all likelihood this is an overlooked species and probably quite
common in suitable habitat.
Dhole (Cuon alpinus)
– 7/2 1m+1f ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 2 ; 10/2 2ad+7juv Pench TR.
– Really cool to see this species on several occasions. The two individuals
seen in Pench on the 9th had separated a young Sambar from it’s mother,
but the young deer had fled into a small lake where it was apparently safe.
The two dogs didn’t follow it into the water, anyway, and since they couldn’t
really take on the mother,they had to give up the chase – so much for the claimed
100% success rate. No doubt they are feared predators, though, and after the unsuccessful
hunt they disappeared into the forest where they scared the crap out of a group of Chitals.
Indian Flying Fox (Pteropus giganteus)
– 8/2 14 Tuli Tiger Corridor, Pench.
– 11/2 450 Pench – Kanha.
– In addition to these big boys, we also saw a number of unidentified smaller bats.
Above the fields around Svasara Jungle Lodge in Tadoba at least one species was seen,
while two or more species were seen at our lodge in Pench.
Southern Plains Grey Langur (Semnopithecus dussumieri )
– Abundant. According to the IUCN this is the langur species of Tadoba and Pench
while the langurs of Kanha are apparently Northern Plains Grey Langur.
We don’t know if they are actually possible to separate in the field.
Northern Plains Grey Langur (Semnopithecus entellus)
– Abundant in Kanha. See comment above.
Rhesus Monkey (Macaca mulatta)
– 8/2 35 Tadoba – Pench.
– 9/2 30 ; 10/2 8 ; 11/2 17 Pench.
– 11/2 35 Pench – Kanha.
– 12/2 8 Kanha.
Wild Boar (Sus scrofa)
– 5/2 11 ; 6/2 7 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 13 Pench TR.
– 11/2 1 ; 12/2 7 ; 13/2 12 ; 14/2 24 Kanha TR.
Common Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus)
– 13/2 1 Kanha.
Jungle Cat (Felis chaus)
– 5/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Leopard (Panthera pardus)
– 6/2 1f ; 7/2 1m Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 13/2 1h Kanha TR.
– Two great sightings of this spectacular species. The male wore a radio-colar,
so hopefully somebody are learning something useful – it sure doesn’t look good!
Tiger (Panthera tigris)
– 6/2 1f+3imm ; 7/2 1f+3imm Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 11/2 1f Pench TR.
– 14/2 h Kanha TR.
– The two observations in Tadoba concern the same tigress, Maya, with three cubs.
This must surely be one of the most beautiful animals on the planet and according
to the local guides their numbers are actually increasing in all three parks,
which is certainly good news! No doubt Indians in general also show
an increasing interest
in seeing, and consequently protecting, them, so maybe the future of the big striped
cat isn’t quite as bleak as we tend to believe… – in India, anyway!
Indian Grey Mongoose (Herpestes edwardsii )
– 6/2 2 ; 7/2 3 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
Ruddy Mongoose (Herpestes smithii )
– 5/2 2 ; 6/2 4 ; 7/2 1 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 12/2 2 ; 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
Golden Jackal (Canis aureus)
– 9/2 3 ; 10/2 2 Pench TR.
– 12/2 3 ; 13/2 2 ; 14/2 2 Kanha TR.
– It’s somewhat surprising that this species doesn’t seem to be found in Tadoba.
None of the reports we’ve read, mention it from there and we didn’t
find it ourselves either.
For such a common and versatile species that seems distinctly odd.
Northern Red Muntjac (Muntiacus vaginalis)
– 5/2 4 ; 6/2 5 ; 7/2 2 ; 8/2 1 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 11/2 1 ; 12/2 2 ; 13/2 1h Kanha TR.
– Tadoba-Andhari TR must surely be one of the best places to see this species.
Or maybe we were just very lucky seeing so many, and seeing quite
a few of them very well.
Barasingha (Carvus duvaucelii branderi )
– 12/2 11 ; 13/2 22 ; 14/2 16 Kanha TR.
– The subspecies branderi, known as Hard-ground Barasingha,
is found only in Kanha TR where it’s now doing okay with a population
between 300 and 400.
Sambar (Cervus unicolor)
– Common in all three parks.
Chital (Axis axis)
– Very common in all three parks.
– This beautiful species somehow embodies the Tiger reserves of North
and Central India,
and is always a joy to watch. They often join the grey langurs,
and we even witnessed a langur feeding a herd of Chitals by picking
leaves from a tree and then dropping them on the ground for the deer to eat.
Nilgai (Boselaphus tragocamelus)
– 6/2 1m Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 9/2 6 ; 10/2 3 ; 11/2 5 Pench TR.
Four-horned Antelope (Tetracerus quadricornis)
– 6/2 1m Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– This small antelope is not very often seen, so we count ourselves
lucky to actually see it quite well, albeit briefly
Gaur (Bos gaurus)
– 5/2 14 ; 6/2 17 ; 7/2 8 Tadoba-Andhari TR.
– 11/2 4 Pench TR.
– 12/2 9 ; 13/2 4 ; 14/2 9 Kanha TR.

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on Feb 15, 2019

Wild World India strives to stimulate an interest and help develop an understanding of the rich natural heritage of the Indian subcontinent. We believe in working closely with our identified network of local naturalists and guides, the ‘insiders’ who have the knowledge to make your wildlife experience both exciting and enriching.

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